Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 29°C

min temp: 18°C

Search

It’s the story of a feisty young girl whose parent figure is determined teach her perfect diction and turn her into a lady. Not only my childhood in a nutshell, but also the premise of the fabulous new production of My Fair Lady at Ipswich Regent.

Three contrasting works by three of Britain’s most significant composers comprised this attractive programme. One work was written during the Second World War and the other two at the time of World War One.

Barnum, the circus musical, that made Michael Crawford, a West End and Broadway star, is being revived in an ambitious production at the end of this month by the Ipswich Co-op Juniors. Alan Ayres spoke to two local aerial artists who have been recuited to handle some of the dazzling stunts in the show

This was a concert with some familiar names – Bartok and Stravinsky - but Guillaume de Machaut and Gyorgy Ligeti are less widely recognised and perhaps this accounted for a smaller than usual audience. Nevertheless, the players of the Mahler Chamber Orchestra performed with distinction in an eclectic and stimulating programme.

This was a recital to savour; one of today’s most celebrated pianists playing two outstanding works from the entire piano canon, what more could one ask?

The Yugoslavia-born pianist has a growing reputation for her performances of some of the tougher piano music of the last century. This quite challenging recital began with Bach and moved through Bartok, Copland and Messiaen to the first sonata by Charles Ives.

Le Concert Spirituel was founded in 1987 by the current conductor, Herve Niquet, with the aim of performing music from the court of Versailles on period instruments. Since then their repertory has expanded and they are widely praised for the dynamism and authenticity of their performances of vocal and instrumental music.

An operatic premiere is always something of an event and the Aldeburgh Festival commissioned a new work from the Manchester based composer Emily Howard.

This opening concert was a good example of what the Aldeburgh Festival does so well - nothing easy or mainstream nor too recherché, but four significant and varied compositions, all originally composed within a ten year period (1939-49), making a coherent and stimulating programme.

After running the gamut of every possible emotion, the audience for Grow Up Grandad, will undoubtedly go home savouring their own individual and personal experience of the story. Performed by the highly skilled Gallery Players at the Sir John Mills Theatre, this delightful small cast play by Gordon Steel was premiered in the North East in 2015.

The title may sound a bit dubious but as all musical theatre fans know The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas is all good clean fun, well almost. David Henshall takes a look at the award-winning show and its roots in real-life

English Touring Theatre powerfully re creates and reimagines Tenessee William’s A Street Car Named Desire in an unmissable production that pushes and shoves the play right into the 21st Century.

In a week where news of war dominates and once again ordinary people just like you and me are being plunged into yet more suffering, Kinder Transport, a play about the evacuation of Jewish children from Nazi Germany feels desperately timely.

Operas are generally large scale affairs – frequently a few acts and a few hours. It is, perhaps, surprising that relatively few ‘short’ operas – around an hour or so – have established a secure niche in the repertoire. Puccini’s trio of such works, ‘Il Trittico’ has certainly found favour and ETO performed two of them at Snape following two well attended performances of Figaro.

Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro remains popular and filled the Maltings on two successive evenings.

The Mass in B minor is one of those enduring pinnacles of musical, indeed human achievement that when performed as superbly as on this occasion becomes a completely transformative experience.

From the programme originally advertised for this concert only Haydn’s Emperor quartet survived, with two rarely performed Dvorak quartets giving way to a different rarity from the same composer and his frequently performed ‘American’ quartet.

Families, at times, are not places for the faint hearted. They can resemble Kangaroo courts with huge great elephants in every corner. Set in Clacton, Guesthouse, written by Nicola Werenowsa, is a drama that unravels 50 years of family history through three generations of the women.

I haven’t read Mantel’s book or seen the TV series, so I always had a perception of Thomas Cromwell as a slimy back stabber, whose most recent claim to fame as an ancestor of Danny Dyer had all but eclipsed his other notoriety in my eyes.

Outrageous, inappropriate and downright hilarious - this is possibly the funniest show I have ever seen at the Theatre Royal.

In this one man show, actor and writer Michael Angus Clarke takes us on a journey from Zimbabwe to East Anglia courtesy of the beautiful game.

The centenary of the Russian Revolution has been marked by a number of cultural events and this sold-out concert featured three of the country’s major composers, spanning the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683-1764) is hardly a household name but he is a significant figure in the history of music, being the first to publish a book laying down the principles of tonal harmony in 1725-6. His first stage work, Hippolyte et Aricie of 1733, created a sensation by breaking with the traditions of Lully and paved the way for his other operas, including Dardanus in 1739. The original version was heavily criticised for its libretto, amongst other things, and revised versions appeared in 1744 and 1760; the edition used by ETO largely followed the version used to open the 1744 run.

For this year’s Britten Weekend, Snape Maltings devised a programme exploring the composer’s work for radio. In particular, there was a focus on one of his most celebrated collaborations – with the poet Louis MacNeice in the radio drama The Dark Tower, first broadcast by the BBC in January 1946.

Reece Witherspoon once said that the most hated line for any actress in a film is when she turns to the man and asks: “Well, what do we do now?”. For in real life she says, when have you ever heard a woman actually say that? In Wait Until Dark, the stage version of the brilliant 1967 Audrey Hepburn film, Susy our heroine, who is also blind, not only knows what to do “now” she also takes on three con artists in this high stakes thriller presented by The Original Theatre Company.

In an adaption by acclaimed playwright Jessica Swale, who has had huge recent West End success with Nell Gwyn starring Gemma Arterton, Gallery Players present Thomas Hardy’s classic Victorian novel of love, pride and class with a charismatic, flawed female character at its centre.

FlipSide is a major literature and arts festival which links Suffolk with South America. This year the festival had Green Issues as its theme. Jackie Montague absorbed the experience.

Graeae urges us to “raise a glass to good times” and then some with the bawdy and brilliant Reasons To Be Cheerful, a musical packed with the iconoclastic back catalogue of Ian Dury and The Blockheads.

This funny and emotive musical about a class of disadvantaged teens on a school trip was originally written by Willy Russell in the 70s but remains just as true and poignant today.

Beethoven, Schumann and Debussy were three of the most inventive and influential composers for the piano and, with the guiding hand of soloist Stephen Hough, some of their finest compositions were the basis of an evening of high musical drama alongside illuminating comparisons and contrasts.

Most read

Show Job Lists

Topic pages

Newsletter Sign Up

Ipswich Star daily newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

MyDate24 MyPhotos24