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Days Gone By - eight former Ipswich pubs that have been consigned to history

PUBLISHED: 19:00 13 September 2016 | UPDATED: 15:48 21 September 2016

Princes Street, Ipswich, in September 1960. The Civic Drive junction is now in the left background of this picture, taken looking towards the town centre. The Friars Inn at the corner of Portman Street is on the right, it closed in 1961. In the background are The Rising Sun, The British Lion and the Friars Head public houses. None of the buildings in this picture are there today.

Princes Street, Ipswich, in September 1960. The Civic Drive junction is now in the left background of this picture, taken looking towards the town centre. The Friars Inn at the corner of Portman Street is on the right, it closed in 1961. In the background are The Rising Sun, The British Lion and the Friars Head public houses. None of the buildings in this picture are there today.

Dave Kindred

Within living memory you could visit eight public houses - now all closed - on a walk along Princes Street, Ipswich, between the Cornhill and the railway station, writes David Kindred.

Princes Street, Ipswich.Princes Street, Ipswich.

The last to go was the Drum and Monkey, which closed earlier this year. When the station opened in 1860 a new link to the town centre was created. In 1856 the cattle market moved from what is now called The Old Cattle Market, to a site on former marshland next to what became Princes Street.

The market, and traffic to and from the station and streets of terraced houses nearby, created a need for so many public houses. Several of the pubs were demolished when the area was redeveloped in the 1960s.

The Marsh Tavern, 93-95 Princes Street, at the corner of Chalon Street closed in May 1960. This photograph was probably taken June 22, 1911, during the Coronation celebrations of George V. The sign on the side of the buggy says  H J Binks, licensed horse slaughterer, Old Marsh Tavern.The Marsh Tavern, 93-95 Princes Street, at the corner of Chalon Street closed in May 1960. This photograph was probably taken June 22, 1911, during the Coronation celebrations of George V. The sign on the side of the buggy says  H J Binks, licensed horse slaughterer, Old Marsh Tavern.

The Marsh Tavern - 93-95 Princes Street

Located at the corner of Chalon Street, The Marsh Tavern closed in May 1960. This photograph was probably taken on June 22, 1911, during the Coronation celebrations of George V. The sign on the side of the buggy says “H J Binks, licensed horse slaughterer, Old Marsh Tavern”.

The British Lion (left background) at 55 Princes Street was at the corner of Edgar Street. It closed and was demolished in 1972. This photograph was taken in February1965 as the Civic Drive roundabout, pedestrian underpass and Greyfriars was being built. The Willis insurance building now stands on this site.The British Lion (left background) at 55 Princes Street was at the corner of Edgar Street. It closed and was demolished in 1972. This photograph was taken in February1965 as the Civic Drive roundabout, pedestrian underpass and Greyfriars was being built. The Willis insurance building now stands on this site.

The British Lion - 55 Princes Street

This pub was found at the corner of Edgar Street. It closed and was demolished in 1972. This photograph was taken in February 1965 as the Civic Drive roundabout, pedestrian underpass and Greyfriars was being built. The Willis insurance building now stands on this site.

The Friars Head was at the junction of Princes Street, Friars Street and Friars Road. It closed on New Years Eve 1971 and was demolished in January 1972. The Willis insurance building is now on this site. This photograph was taken in the mid 1930s.The Friars Head was at the junction of Princes Street, Friars Street and Friars Road. It closed on New Years Eve 1971 and was demolished in January 1972. The Willis insurance building is now on this site. This photograph was taken in the mid 1930s.

The Friars Head - at the junction of Princes Street, Friars Street and Friars Road

This pub closed on New Year’s Eve 1971 and was demolished in January 1972. The Willis insurance building is now on this site. This photograph was taken in the mid 1930s.

The second pgoto shows fifts for the landlord and landlady of the pub on New Year’s Eve 1971, the last night before demolition of the site.

Gifts for the landlord and landlady of the Friars Head public house, Ipswich, on New years Eve 1971, the last night before demolition of the site. Do you know anybody featured?
(Photo by Ivan Smith/Archant)Gifts for the landlord and landlady of the Friars Head public house, Ipswich, on New years Eve 1971, the last night before demolition of the site. Do you know anybody featured? (Photo by Ivan Smith/Archant)

Do you know anybody featured?

The Sporting Farmer/Drum and Monkey - close to the cattle market site

The Sporting Farmer/Drum and Monkey opened in December 17, 1962, close to the cattle market site, near the junction with Portman Road. The license had been transferred from the Three Swans opposite, which closed the day before. It was modernised in 1990 and renamed the Drum and Monkey. It closed in May this year. This photograph was taken by Albert Gonzalez in the 1980s.The Sporting Farmer/Drum and Monkey opened in December 17, 1962, close to the cattle market site, near the junction with Portman Road. The license had been transferred from the Three Swans opposite, which closed the day before. It was modernised in 1990 and renamed the Drum and Monkey. It closed in May this year. This photograph was taken by Albert Gonzalez in the 1980s.

The pub originally opened on December 17, 1962, close to the cattle market site, near the junction with Portman Road. The licence had been transferred from the Three Swans opposite, which closed the day before. It was modernised in 1990 and renamed the Drum and Monkey. It closed in May this year. This photograph was taken by Albert Gonzalez in the 1980s.

The Market Hotel - 91 Princes Street

The Market Hotel at 91 Princes Street, was at the corner of Chalon Street and closed around 1957. It was being used as a car sales room when this photograph was taken in the early 1960s. All of the buildings featured were demolished in the 1960s redevelopment of the area.The Market Hotel at 91 Princes Street, was at the corner of Chalon Street and closed around 1957. It was being used as a car sales room when this photograph was taken in the early 1960s. All of the buildings featured were demolished in the 1960s redevelopment of the area.

The pub, which was at the corner of Chalon Street, closed around 1957. It was being used as a car sales room when this photograph was taken in the early 1960s. All of the buildings featured were demolished in the 1960s redevelopment of the area.

The next photo shows a charabanc outing from the Market Hotel, Princes Street, Ipswich, in the 1920s. Everybody wore their best clothes for this day trip.

A charabanc outing from the Market Hotel, Princes Street, Ipswich, in the 1920s. Everybody wore their best clothes for this day trip.A charabanc outing from the Market Hotel, Princes Street, Ipswich, in the 1920s. Everybody wore their best clothes for this day trip.

The Rising Sun - 63 Princes Street

Located at the corner of James Street, The Rising Sun closed in 1961. This photograph was taken in July 1948. The building was demolished during redevelopment of the area in the 1960s.

The Rising Sun, 63 Princes Street, at the corner of James Street, closed in 1961. This photograph was taken in July 1948. The building was demolished during redevelopment of the area in the 1960s.The Rising Sun, 63 Princes Street, at the corner of James Street, closed in 1961. This photograph was taken in July 1948. The building was demolished during redevelopment of the area in the 1960s.

The Three Swans - 83-85 Princes Street

The Three Swans was found at the corner of Cecilia, but closed December 1962. In the left background is Spurling and Hempson’s horse sale yard. Knights tobacconists is on the right. The building was demolished soon after closure and Mann Egerton’s garage was built on this site. This photograph was taken in January 1949.

The Three Swans, 83-85 Princes Street, at the corner of Cecilia, closed December 1962. In the left background is Spurling and Hempsons horse sale yard. Knights tobacconists is on the right. The building was demolished soon after closure and Mann Egertons garage was built on this site. This photograph was taken in January 1949.The Three Swans, 83-85 Princes Street, at the corner of Cecilia, closed December 1962. In the left background is Spurling and Hempsons horse sale yard. Knights tobacconists is on the right. The building was demolished soon after closure and Mann Egertons garage was built on this site. This photograph was taken in January 1949.

These final images show Princes Street in days gone by. The first was taken around a century ago, looking towards the town centre from close to the Chalon Street junction. The cattle market was behind the trees on the left. The electric trams ran a service from the station to the Cornhill.

The second shows Princes Street during flooding in February 1939. The Rising Sun public house, at the corner of James Street, is on the left. The photographer was standing where the Civic Drive junction is, now looking towards the railway station.

Princes Street, Ipswich, as it was around a century ago, looking towards the town centre from close to the Chalon Street junction. The cattle market was behind the trees on the left. The electric trams ran a service from the station to the Cornhill.Princes Street, Ipswich, as it was around a century ago, looking towards the town centre from close to the Chalon Street junction. The cattle market was behind the trees on the left. The electric trams ran a service from the station to the Cornhill.

Do you remember any of the public houses featured in Days Gone By this week? Share your memories via email

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