max temp: 11°C

min temp: 10°C


East Anglia: Owner of Colchester Zoo teams up with man behind Africa Alive and Banham Zoo to fight proposals to shorten school summer holidays

15:43 19 August 2014

Dominic Tropeano in front of Colchester Zoo's white Tiger enclosure

Dominic Tropeano in front of Colchester Zoo's white Tiger enclosure

East Anglian tourism bosses have warned of the “economic harm” a new law to allow schools to axe the long summer holiday could have on attractions in Suffolk.

Martin Dupée, director of Zoological Society of East Anglia, which is behind Africa Alive in Kessingland and Banham Zoo, has put his name to a letter calling for a proper assessment of the “ill-conceived” legislation.

Former education secretary Michael Gove claimed while in the post that the education system was being “handicapped” by a 19th-Century timetable and pupil performance dipped when they were off in July and August, leaving them at a disadvantage to students in other countries.

The Deregulation Bill, which has been voted through the House of Commons and will be examined by the House of Lords when they return after the summer break, would give all schools across England the freedom to dictate the shape of their academic year.

In a letter to a national Sunday newspaper, 24 bosses, which also included Dominique Tropeano, zoo director at Colchester Zoo, said: “The tourism industry relies on the summer months, and particularly the six-week school summer holiday period, for its success.

“The seasonal nature of many attractions, especially those outdoors, means that they close during periods of the year when it is uneconomical to open, then spend months treading water, trying to turn a profit.

“The Deregulation Bill, which is in its final stages in the House of Lords, contains clauses that permit school summer holidays to be shortened from six weeks to four. Michael Gove stated on numerous occasions that shortening the summer holiday period was his intention and those close to him admitted that this was being looked at.”

They added: “Many in the tourism industry survived the recession by the skin of their teeth. The economic harm provided for within the Bill is deeply worrying.

“We call on the Government to engage with the tourism industry, consult, and properly assess the impact of this ill-conceived legislation.”

Earlier this summer Waveney MP Peter Aldous wrote to the new education secretary Nicky Morgan reiterating his concerns about Government proposals to shorten summer holidays. It follows a speech he made during the third reading of the bill, when it was going through the House of Commons.

In a letter to the minister, he said: “There is a concern that this measure could have a significant adverse impact on the tourism industry, in particular on family seaside attractions”, adding that it should be recognised that “these businesses are important local employers, often clustered in coastal locations, where invariably the local economy faces greater challenges”.

He also said that allowing individual schools to set their own term time could mean different schools would have different holiday dates, causing difficulties for parents with children at different schools.

“Whilst I understand the reasoning behind the school holiday proposals in terms of achieving higher student attainment and giving greater autonomy to schools, it is vital that its impact on areas like Waveney that rely on tourism for its economic well-being are fully taken into account,” he added.

Mr Dupée said that he did 40% of his business in July and August.


  • Six weeks is already a ridiculously short period for the school summer holidays. Most countries have breaks of 8, 10 or 12 weeks, with only short breaks at Xmas and Easter. We should be moving in that direction.

    Report this comment


    Tuesday, August 19, 2014

  • The tourist industry are more likely worried that they won't know when to charge peak prices!

    Report this comment

    Jack Hedley

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014

  • If this Country does not get its act together we wont have a tourism industry. With so many people working on zero hours contracts, minimum wage rates, and lack of support for small businesses there is are serious issues stacking up. The ongoing reductions in disposable income are starting to have an effect particularly on the smaller businesses within the tourism sector..

    Report this comment

    Grey Fox

    Tuesday, August 19, 2014

  • good comment , speaks for everyone.

    Report this comment


    Tuesday, August 19, 2014

  • Are they serious? They want the educational timetable of our children to be tailored to suit the needs of the tourism industry?... I have another idea altogether: why don't those tourist attractions make an effort to organise themselves around the timetable to suit the needs of their customers, if they want them to keep coming!

    Report this comment


    Tuesday, August 19, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

It’s nearly Halloween and there is a variety of events across Suffolk this half term to keep your little monsters entertained no matter what their age.

A wedding dress catwalk, singers, cakes, flowers and a string quartet were among the bridal delights on offer at Ipswich Hotel’s Wedding Fayre today.

Stormtroopers marched the streets of Bury St Edmunds this weekend as Moyse’s Hall unveiled its acclaimed annual science fiction exhibition.

An armed police officer was called to Kesgrave as a safety precaution after a report was received of an injured dog today.

Last week’s article was about Oak Hill, the outstanding property just off Belstead Road on Oak Hill Lane, built in 1860 on a plot of land sold by Peter Burrell of Stoke Park, recaps John Norman, of the Ipswich Society.

A disqualified motorist banned for a drink-drive related offence was caught driving again while nearly four-and-a-half times the limit within two hours of his conviction.

Plans for Sizewell C are doomed to “evaporate” in the wake of insurmountable problems that will prevent its intended forerunner at Hinkley Point ever producing electricity, one of Britain’s leading environmentalists has predicted.

Arthur Ransome’s tales of boats and adventure - many of which were set in Suffolk - changed the course of children’s literature.

A Suffolk-based charity auction which has attracted bids from all over the world and raised more than £870,000 since its inception is aiming to break the £1million mark for national and local charities this year.

Fight or flight is fascinating, writes Ellen Widdup.

Most read


Show Job Lists

Topic pages


Newsletter Sign Up

MyDate24 MyPhotos24