Education: Suffolk prepared to dish out new free school meals initiative but concerns whether Essex will be ready for new term

Graham White of the Suffolk branch of the National Union of Teachers Graham White of the Suffolk branch of the National Union of Teachers

Saturday, August 16, 2014
6:00 AM

From the start of the new term in September schools will have to provide free meals to all pupils between the ages of four and seven.

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The move has been funded by the government after Nick Clegg, the deputy Prime Minister, announced the initiative earlier this year.

It is thought parents could save around £400 a year through the scheme.

But while some counties such as Suffolk are ready for the new measures others like Essex are concerned they haven’t been given enough time.

A spokesman for Essex County Council, which was given £3.157m from the government to upgrade school kitchens, said: “Works are taking place across Essex. The council is working closely with schools and contractors to make sure the necessary improvements are in place by September.

“A scheme of this magnitude has never been undertaken before and we will have a clearer view of the status of each kitchen in the first week of September.”

Jerry Glazier, general secretary of the Essex National Union of Teachers (NUT) branch, warns that there may be “teething problems”.

He said: “I guess they probably are going to be winging it, they seem less than certain.

“The picture is a mix across the county. Some schools were better placed than others to expand, while others had historically got rid of their facilities.

“You have to accept people are working hard to put in place the necessary equipment but it may not be perfect at the start of term, which would be a pity if that was the case.

A spokesman for Suffolk County Council said: “We’ve been working with schools before the summer and over the holidays to get them ready to provide free school meals for Reception, Year One and Year Two pupils.

“In most cases this has required a bit of extra kitchen equipment but in other cases it has involved building whole new kitchens.”

Three schools will benefit from completely knew facilities: Springfield Infant School, St Pancras Catholic Primary and St Mary’s Catholic Primary School, all in Ipswich. Previously the meals they served were prepared by neighbouring schools.

In total £1.7million has been spent by SCC getting ready for the changes which come into effect next month, with all of it coming from central government.

Equipment purchased for the county’s school’s includes more than 40 combi ovens, more than 40 heated mobile service counters, upwards of 70 fridge-freezers and around 12,000 items of crockery, including beakers, trays and cutlery.

The council has been working with East Anglian Tastes for Schools (EATS) to implement the new policy.

Chris Denny from EATS said: We’ve been busy recruiting additional staff and across the county that’s around 200 part-time staff.

“I think it will be very useful (for children) to get in the habit of having a hot two-course meal and eating with their friends and all the benefits of having a good balanced diet.”

Graham White, speaking on behalf of the West Suffolk branch of the National Union of Teachers, said he welcomed the introduction of the scheme.

However he added an increased demand for meals could lead to problems serving them up.

“We may have more than one sitting which isn’t an ideal situation,” he said. But it’s better than not having them.

“We absolutely welcome it but in some schools it will present problems.”

4 comments

  • Waspie's wife...MZH..Very well said.

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    waspie

    Monday, August 18, 2014

  • Far too many parents seem to believe they have no responsibility for their own offspring - too many seem to believe it is primary school who should teach children English, toilet train them, teach them manners, responsibility and discipline and now they'll feed them for free too! How long before complaints that the free meals provided aren't good enough, don't cater to their child's dietary needs, don't offer enough variation or large enough portions? How is this practical and why is it needed, when I was a child money at home was tight and yet my parents managed to feed me properly every day, then again they didn't spend their hard earned money on cigarettes, alcohol and foreign holidays! People need to live within their means and look after their own children, not expect the country to do everything for them! Rant over!

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    MZH

    Sunday, August 17, 2014

  • Waspie's wife...So thy need to spend a fortune putting back kitchens we had when I was at school when we only had hot dinners. By the time my children were at secondary, they brought in packed lunches, to cut down on staff supervision.Got rid of kitchens! I'd have preferred it not to change. My parents paid for school, dinners as I paid for my children, only the poorer got subsidised. How much is this all costing. It wasn't broken, it never needed fixing!!!!

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    waspie

    Saturday, August 16, 2014

  • pity they cannot do the same for some really hard up pensioners [ in their middle eightys]

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    TERENCE MANNING

    Saturday, August 16, 2014

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