Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 5°C

min temp: 3°C

Search

Gallery: Nature’s beautiful carpet transforms our woodlands as bluebells blossom in Suffolk

PUBLISHED: 18:30 29 April 2014 | UPDATED: 18:30 29 April 2014

Bluebells near Campsea Ashe with large rhea wandering through - Richard Kemp

Bluebells near Campsea Ashe with large rhea wandering through - Richard Kemp

RJ Kemp

Suffolk’s rolling countryside has a glistening blue and purple tinge after being treated to a proliferation of early-season bluebells.

It is little wonder readers have inundated our mailboxes with enchanting photographs of the ancient woodlander; considered the nation’s favourite wild flower.

The bluebells carpeting the county have emerged early this year, transforming Suffolk into a sea of blue.

It was only 12 months ago when the coldest March since 1962 left fields barren of the bluebell in a disappointing spring.

“They are flowering far earlier than in last year’s cold spring when things were generally three weeks behind,” said Audrey Boyle, communications manager at the Suffolk Wildlife Trust.

“This year we have had peak displays of bluebells just when everyone’s been out and about at Easter – so they have been thoroughly appreciated.

“Walking through acres of bluebells on a mild spring day is without a doubt one of the most uplifting wildlife experiences.

“Bluebell woods epitomise the English countryside, and here in Suffolk we are fortunate that there are still outstanding examples.”

The bluebell starts growing in January with its sole purpose to flower before the other woodland plants.

The first bluebell leaves appear in January and the plants are usually in full bloom by late April or early May.

The timing of flowering depends on elevation, latitude, aspect, soils, geology and climate conditions.

Peter Bash, a contributing iwitness member, said: “A deserted scented wood, with no sound but the birds and the crack of a twig underfoot.

“Scenes like this are the stuff that dreams are made of, and definitely far from the maddening crowd of city life and shopping malls.”

Visit www.suffolkwildlifetrust.org/bluebells for more.

Women’s rights campaigner Helen Taylor, 46, founded Suffolk’s first feminist society in 2016. Reporter Gemma Mitchell has caught up with her to gain her views on gender inequality and how to tackle it.

Suffolk Wildlife Trust is seeking the services of a special volunteer – one who isn’t afraid of the dark.

Hopes of developing through rail services between Ipswich and the south west of England are still being considered – despite fears that a new cross-country rail link may only be for commuter services.

Much of the area of Ipswich, bound by Cauldwell Hall Road, Woodbridge Road and Foxhall Road, is part of the town developed by the Suffolk Freehold Land Society.

Forecasters have warned of strong winds of around 65mph that are expected to sweep into the county this evening, as a wet and windy night is expected to continue into the morning.

Lorries were destroyed in a fire aboard a passenger liner on its way to Harwich International Port this morning.

This Saturday is the last time weekend rail travellers from East Anglia will be able to reach London without having to complete part of the journey by bus until after Easter.

Community leaders will tomorrow decide whether or not to order changes to be made to a property which was not built in line with the approved plans.

Suffolk is in the final five for BBC Countryfile Magazine’s Holiday Destination of the Year 2018 – and needs your vote to scoop the prestigious award.

Do you remember when The Bobby Charlton Soccer School made a trip to Ipswich over 35 years ago to hold a session at Thurleston High School.

Most read

Show Job Lists

Topic pages

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter
MyDate24 MyPhotos24