FROM flash mobs to fancy dress days – hundreds of people have taken part in an array of weird and wonderful events to raise money for Children in Need.

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Thousands of pounds were raised on Friday and over the weekend for the cause, which has so far raised more than £26million.

In Ipswich, the CEO of insurance firm, Willis, spent time in the stocks for charity while workers at Ipswich Building Society spent the day in their onesies.

On Saturday, about 25 cyclists completed 100 laps of Foxhall Stadium, the equivalent of about 24 miles, raising hundreds of pounds in the process.

Kevin Wegg, 50, who took part in the challenge, said: “It was a fantastic day.

“I follow speedway so it was a chance to help a truly wonderful charity and have lots of fun at the same time.”

Meanwhile, Back in Time was the fancy dress theme for students at Suffolk One and staff at 1EasyCall raised £500 with a cake sale, chest waxing and various other games.

In Felixstowe, a number of events were taking place at the Felixstowe Academy, including leg waxing, fancy dress and a break-time flash mob which saw more than 100 pupils dance to South Korean rapper Psy’s Gangnam Style.

Deputy head girl, Sasha Lawson-Frost, said: “It has been really good because as well as raising money, the sixth form and main school comes together.”

Elsewhere in the resort, Felixstowe Radio put on a 24-hour broadcast and Darren Bennett, of Langer Road, had his hair shaved. Staff at Ceva, which is based at the Port of Felixstowe, a logistics company, helped to raise more than £1,100 on Friday through a number of initiatives including a raffle.

Samantha Pepper, ocean imports co-ordinator, said: “It has been brilliant – a really good day.

“I can’t believe how generous everyone has been, I didn’t expect to get anywhere near this much.”

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