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Gallery: Nature’s beautiful carpet transforms our woodlands as bluebells blossom in Suffolk

18:30 29 April 2014

Bluebells near Campsea Ashe with large rhea wandering through - Richard Kemp

Bluebells near Campsea Ashe with large rhea wandering through - Richard Kemp

RJ Kemp

Suffolk’s rolling countryside has a glistening blue and purple tinge after being treated to a proliferation of early-season bluebells.

It is little wonder readers have inundated our mailboxes with enchanting photographs of the ancient woodlander; considered the nation’s favourite wild flower.

The bluebells carpeting the county have emerged early this year, transforming Suffolk into a sea of blue.

It was only 12 months ago when the coldest March since 1962 left fields barren of the bluebell in a disappointing spring.

“They are flowering far earlier than in last year’s cold spring when things were generally three weeks behind,” said Audrey Boyle, communications manager at the Suffolk Wildlife Trust.

“This year we have had peak displays of bluebells just when everyone’s been out and about at Easter – so they have been thoroughly appreciated.

“Walking through acres of bluebells on a mild spring day is without a doubt one of the most uplifting wildlife experiences.

“Bluebell woods epitomise the English countryside, and here in Suffolk we are fortunate that there are still outstanding examples.”

The bluebell starts growing in January with its sole purpose to flower before the other woodland plants.

The first bluebell leaves appear in January and the plants are usually in full bloom by late April or early May.

The timing of flowering depends on elevation, latitude, aspect, soils, geology and climate conditions.

Peter Bash, a contributing iwitness member, said: “A deserted scented wood, with no sound but the birds and the crack of a twig underfoot.

“Scenes like this are the stuff that dreams are made of, and definitely far from the maddening crowd of city life and shopping malls.”

Visit www.suffolkwildlifetrust.org/bluebells for more.

1 comment

  • Nice pic. Pity about the large, heavy footed and very conspicuous rhea wandering around tramping everything into the soil under its great big webbed toes. It is hardly a welcome addition to the fragile eco-system of Suffolk's woodlands!

    Report this comment

    Steve Blake

    Tuesday, April 29, 2014

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