Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 18°C

min temp: 16°C

Search

Ipswich/Suffolk: Baby boom leads to 40pc rise in new arrivals in the last decade

PUBLISHED: 13:17 24 January 2013 | UPDATED: 13:17 24 January 2013

Ipswich has seen a baby boom in the last decade, with births rocketing by 40 per cent

Ipswich has seen a baby boom in the last decade, with births rocketing by 40 per cent

FIGURES reveal Ipswich and Suffolk has seen a baby boom during the last decade.

One of the most significant factors behind the increase is the number of babies born to migrant parents.

Birth rates published by the Office for National Statistics show in 2002 in Ipswich 183 babies were born to migrant mums, while in 2011 that figure jumped to 448 babies – a 145pc increase.

The Royal College of Midwives this week advised the government that 5,000 extra midwives would be needed to cope with a national boom, a 22pc rise in nine years.

But in Ipswich, despite a 40pc rise in birth rates since 2002, the hospital said it has no shortage of midwives.

In Suffolk the rise in birth rate was 22.7pc, in line with the national average across the same time period.

The department at Heath Road employs 124 whole time equivalent midwife posts and currently has no vacancies.

Last year 3,807 babies were born at Ipswich Hospital – around ten each day. In 2011 the maternity unit welcomed 3,802 tots into the world.

Christine Colbourne the hospital’s head of midwifery, with 32 years’ experience delivering babies at the trust, said her team has never had to turn women away because of staffing shortages.

“We have noticed an increase in migrant mums over the last five years,” she said.

“We have not had an increase in the number of women overall, but the complexity and increase in care needs has been marked, mostly due to underlying medical needs and obesity.”

Hamil Clarke, a trustee of the Ipswich and Suffolk Council for Racial Equality (ISCRE) said the figures were not a surprise.

“There are a number of migrant workers in the town and many are young people, so it is natural that we would see a rise in the number of babies born to these families,” he said.

“These people are making a huge contribution to the local economy.

“Migrant populations are very important to the town. Many migrant workers are doing jobs that the indigenous population do not want to do.

“This is really positive for Ipswich.”

Related articles

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Police today said the driver who died after a collision between two lorries and a car on the A140 at Mendlesham was from the Ipswich area.

The family of a 24-year-old new mother who suffered a severe brain injury while under the care of Ipswich Hospital say they are dismayed with the outcome of an independent investigation.

The Suffolk BME Business Awards are back for 2017 - and nominations are now open.

Olympian Victoria Pendleton suited up in full body armour to try her hand at jousting in the grounds of a Suffolk castle.

The company which runs Foxhall Stadium today pleaded guilty to jeopardising the safety of the public at the speedway and banger racing venue.

The mother of missing Corrie McKeague has said thank you to the “incredible” army of thousands of people who pressured police into halting a landfill cell from being filled in.

A team of Suffolk social workers are preparing to realise a shared ambition of conquering Britain’s highest peaks, while raising funds for East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices (EACH).

Jesse Webb can be forgiven for not remembering the final score of the first football match he attended the year was 1923 and he was only a six-year-old.

NHS job vacancies in the east of England in the first quarter of 2017 have reached 8,612 - an increase of 13% on the year before.

Campaigners are preparing for a big battle with the government to try to get funding for a major upgrade on one of the most important rail junctions in Suffolk.

Most read

Show Job Lists

Topic pages

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter
MyDate24 MyPhotos24