Sunny

Sunny

max temp: 7°C

min temp: 2°C

Search

Ipswich: Historic book charts the development Waterfront

13:21 20 June 2014

The building of the Wet Dock Quays by hand, revealed in a discovered photographic archive, now in the care of the Ipswich Maritime Trust

The building of the Wet Dock Quays by hand, revealed in a discovered photographic archive, now in the care of the Ipswich Maritime Trust

Archant

A unique glimpse of how the Wet Dock quays were built by hand

shares
Ipswich Maritime Trust members Bob Pawsey and Leonard Woolf examing the book which chronicles how the Wet Dock Quays were built by hand.Ipswich Maritime Trust members Bob Pawsey and Leonard Woolf examing the book which chronicles how the Wet Dock Quays were built by hand.

The Ipswich Maritime Trust continues to gather fascinating historical information about the development of the port of Ipswich and the Wet Dock.

A remarkable leather-bound volume has recently come to light over 100 years since it was first produced by the old Ipswich Dock Commission’s chief engineer.

It was recently acquired by Ipswich Maritime Trust member Leonard Woolf, and gives us a uniquely detailed record of the construction company’s design and construction of the south-west quays in Ipswich Wet Dock. All the tendering specifications, estimates, contracts and bills together with 49 photographs of the work during construction were bound into one volume by the contractors, Easton Gibb & Son.

In the picture, Leonard Woolf and Trust director Bob Pawsey are seen examining the volume.

Trust director Stuart Grimwade describes how, after the construction of the present Wet Dock in 1843 (then the largest of its kind in Europe), the old riverside sloping beach on the south-west side of the dock was used to load ballast for sailing ships that had discharged their cargo.

And so it was not until the need for this activity declined with the coming of steam ships that the South-West Quay we see today was constructed during the period 1902-1905. The construction records are remarkable for the amount of manual labour required, and by today’s standards, the low wages of the men involved. The low wages were endorsed by the low values of the estimates and bills. It is rare to have such a first-hand and personal description of the kind of practical problems that arose on such a major project in those days, and the way they were resolved as the work went along.

The contemporary pictures, one of which is shown here, are remarkable in showing the variety of vessels and lighters using the Wet Dock as well as a detailed record of the quay construction methods.

Leonard Woolf has agreed to donate the use of the records to the Ipswich Maritime Trust and all the photographs have now been scanned by Stuart Grimwade into the Trust’s image archive.

shares
Rollerworld Colchester

A casting call to recruit keen skaters for a music video at Colchester’s iconic rollerblading venue has received 60 responses in just 24 hours.

Remnants of what is thought to be an 18th century ship found by Mark Hopkins on Thorpeness beach

Remnants of a what is thought to be a centuries-old shipwreck have resurfaced on the Suffolk coast.

Early morning sunrise at Southwold - visit the pier for a quirky day out

With Valentine’s Day nearly upon us, editor in chief Terry Hunt has shared his list of Suffolk’s top 10 romantic places - so there is no excuse not to make your beloved feel special.

How will you make your Valentine feel special this weekend?

A secret admirer has come clean about his feelings for a shop assistant in Ipswich - could you be the object of his affections?

An artist's impression of the street scene at Wolsey Grange.

Plans for hundreds of homes on the outskirts of Ipswich have been approved – despite being shot down at a previous meeting.

An early 'dishwasher' at the 1920 Ideal Home Show Exhibition - they don't build them like they used to

They don’t build them like they used - that is the sentiment of a Suffolk man who has finally scrapped his trusty dishwasher 27 years after it was first installed.

Beardmore Park.
lings

The relocation of a Martlesham garden centre, which had been facing closure, could pave the way for Marks and Spencer to expand its neighbouring store significantly.

St Mary-at-the-Quay church.

The medieval Waterfront building is undergoing a £5million transformation to become a multi-use community centre with a wellbeing and heritage centre theme.

The accident happened on the A12 at Chelmsford

All lanes have now reopened on the A12 at Chelmsford following an accident in which a man died this morning.

A few views of the river Stour at Flatford

From gusty wind and grey skies, to calm waters and a sneaky peak at the winter sun - this week has been a changeable one weatherwise.

Most read

Most commented

HOT JOBS

Show Job Lists

Topic pages

Streetlife

Great British Life

Great British Life
MyDate24 MyPhotos24