Ipswich: New bid to recognise properties identified as being of architectural and historical significance – is your home on the list?

Grimwade Memorial Hall Grimwade Memorial Hall

Wednesday, September 11, 2013
3:02 PM

A new initiative to raise awareness of buildings of architectural and historic significance in Ipswich has been launched by the borough council.

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Bramford Road Methodist ChurchBramford Road Methodist Church

A new initiative to raise awareness of buildings of architectural and historic significance in Ipswich has been launched by the borough council.

The Supplementary Planning Document Local List (Buildings of Townscape Interest) features hundreds of schools, churches and industrial sites which are not listed but considered “interesting and locally notable historic assets which make up the historic environment of our town”.

But there are also a number of homes on the list, including properties in Constable Road, Belstead Road and Burrell Road.

So, did your home make the cut?

Ipswich Railway StationIpswich Railway Station

Alan Road Methodist Church

Built in 1880 as the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel by Alfred Hubert. Red Brick with early Art Nouveau windows. The adjoining schoolroom of 1877 was probably the original chapel. The building occupies a corner site at the junction of Alan Road and Rosehill Road and is of considerable importance through its dominating gabled ridge line and arched porch.

Alexandra Park Boundary Marker

Parish boundary markers were important features in the administration of the Parish. The Parish dealt with such matters as

relief for the poor, provision of street lighting etc. for which rates were paid by householders so it was important to have the areas accurately marked out.

Byles Fountain, Alexandra Park

Alexandra Park was originally the grounds of Hill House owned by the Byles family. When Alderman Charles Cowell former Mayor of Ipswich inherited the grounds from his mother Marianne Byles, he donated the land to the town and it became Byles Park. In 1905 Charles Cowell gifted a drinking fountain to the town to be erected in Byles Park. The inscription reads as follows: “In

remembrance of the Byles family to whom this park belonged for more than 100 years, this drinking fountain was erected in 1905 by Charles Henry Cowell, Alderman of the Borough and twice Mayor of Ipswich, whose mother was Marianne Byles, born at Hill House 1801.”

Burlingham House, 1 – 5 Ancaster Road

Substantial 3 storey detached house in its own grounds. Late Victorian / Edwardian. Red brick, clay tile roof. Ornate gabled

porch to main entrance. Garden elevations have 2 storey bay windows including to the north-east a window that wraps the corner. Segmental headed windows have sliding sash panes with fixed panes above divided by glazing bars. Mullioned and

transomed windows as well. 3 tall brick chimney stacks.

Suffolk College Annexe, Argyle Street

The site was developed in 1872-3 as one of the first four Board Schools in Ipswich. Designed by Henry Medgett Eyton (1833-1900), a locally based architect the building has a prominent street elevation which steps up the slope in a series of prominent triangular brick gables. Each gable is emphasised by an inset arch over the main window openings and in the main gable by a flush ashlar arch framing a carved stone roundel. The original timber window frames survive, twinned and triple sash windows under fixed lights subdivided into six panes by glazing bars.

6 The Avenue

(Late 1950s). Architect: Peter Barefoot. 2 storey detached modern house. Buff brick, stained timber cladding. Shallow inverted pitch roof, felt covered, the shorter slope added over a later extension and forming a butterfly roof profile with the original single pitch. Single chimney stack and square brick service core appear above the roofline. Timber cladding to the upper floors. Large window openings, original frames.

Grimwade Memorial Hall, Back Hamlet

(1869) Designed by architects Cattermole and Eade. The building is red brick with heavy “Rogue” Gothic stone details and a slate roof. The building occupies an important elevated site at the junction of Fore Hamlet and Back Hamlet. St Clement’s Congregational Church, Back Hamlet. 1887 designed by William Eade. Red brick with some stone finials and slate covered roof. This building occupies an important elevated site and has a dignified composition with porch and tower cleverly contained within the main form.

458 Belstead Road

After 1882. Two storey. Suffolk white brick, slate roof. Twin bays with brick arches to first floor windows. Projecting brick eaves and string courses. Original sash windows, 2 light. Modern roof dormer. Brick arched porch to entrance. Modern brick boundary wall. Lean-to glazed conservatory on side.

65 Belstead Road

(1899). Architect: EF Bisshopp. 3 storey semi detached, twinned with 67. Half hipped roof with small gablet. Red brick, clay tile roof. Rendered second floor on the gable, below the hip, incised to resemble masonry and projecting slightly. Central entrance door with ‘Gibbs’ style surround, large two storey bay to one side, shallower single storey bay on the other. Large single dormer in roof. All upper floor windows divided with glazing bars. On the end elevation , a 2 storey bay window next to projecting brick chimney stack.

67 Belstead Road

Twin to No.65

66 Belstead Road

1891. Architect: JS Corder. 3 storey detached house. Rendered exterior. Red brick dressings around entrance and bay window. Terracotta plaques. Clay tile roof. Prominent brick chimney stacks. 66a & 68 Belstead Road. 1879. Suffolk white brick. Slate roof. Brick dentilled eaves & string course. Windows: ground floor, 2 light sash. First floor, 2 and 4 light sash. Stone window lintels. 2nd floor: 4 light sash. Side elev.

73 Belstead Road

1920. 2 storey detached house. Red brick. Close tiled roof. Some 2 light sash windows with rubbed brick arches. 2 single leaded light windows. Ground floor – unusual central window. 8 light with stone mullions & transoms and a terracotta ornamental arch above. Single storey brick extension at side – flat roof. 7 light sash windows. An unusual feature is the brick corner buttress at Ground floor level. Original brick garden wall.

31 – 37 Bond Street – The Ragged School

1900. Architect: Eade and Johns. Single storey school building. Red brick, slate roof. Right hand gable is an extension dated 1912. 3 gables face road with lower section between each. Each gable has a large window approx. 2 metres wide and high made up of casements. All windows are casements with white painted surrounds, and arches over 2 entrances - one marked ‘Girls’ and the other ‘Boys’, in same style.

Bourne Park War Memorial

Rectangular stone plinth on steps set centrally in a formal flower garden. Engraved copper plaques.

Bramford Road Methodist Church

1889 Architect: Eade and Johns. Originally constructed as a Wesleyan chapel and school. Pitched roof over main body of church

with short lower north end, transepts and, on the street frontage, smaller projections to either side of a gabled south elevation. Brick with ornate stone dressings. Clay tile roof. Decorative timber framing in the apex of gables, projecting timber eaves on brackets. The carved stone detailing is distinctive, for instance the cusped tracery in the windows at ground and first floor level, the ogee hood moulds at ground floor level, reticulated tracery in the large four centered window at first floor level facing the street.

134 Britannia Road

Flats 1-16. 1903. Architect: Henry Wright. Probationary House for St Johns Childrens Home. Two storey, red brick, central entrance gable with stone Gibbs classical doorcase flanked by stone mullioned windows with hood mouldings. Timber frame with brick nogging under gable, projecting on stone corbels. Wings at each side, each with 3 window range. Rosemary clay tile roof.

Britannia Road Infants School

1902. Architect: Brown & Burgess. Single storey school of 4 classrooms, two of which form part of the assembly hall. Red brick, stone dressings. To the street , recessed two bay entrance front between two larger gables which project forwards. Original square headed mullion and transom windows with lights subdivided by glazing bars. Projecting stone keystones; above the windows in the main gables, semicircular stone arches with keystones and blank stone tympana.

Burlington Road Baptist Church

1875. Architect: Brightwen Binyon. In red brick with white brick and stone dressings. Large pitch roofed Italianate chapel building with main frontage to London Road. The entrance elevation has a slightly projecting central bay, framed by white brick pilasters which support a heavy gable on Lombardic style corbels. Recessed entrance vestibule under paired round arched

openings; the arches rest on a decorative projecting string course which extends the full width of the elevation and supports smaller arches over side doors.

Ipswich Railway Station

Burrell Road. (1860) Architect: Robert Sinclair. 2 storey central block with single storey ancillary stores and offices. Suffolk white brick and slate roof with hipped central section. Triple brick arched entrances – string course, cornice and window surrounds to main building in red brick. Windows a notable feature – 11, 9 and 2 light sashes under rubbed red brick arches. Double brick pediment to each side of main entrance (at first floor level). Boarded canopy to street elevation with original decorated cast iron bracket supports. Main platform (no.2) modernised but No.3 platform (on island built 1883) retains original canopy with saw tooth roof line and ornamental boarded gable ends facing track, again with original

cast iron supporting structure. Island building – similar in detail to main block.

27-35 Burrell Road

Late 19th century. 3 storey terraced group. Red brick. Nos 27 and 29 have original slate roof; otherwise, later concrete tile replacement. Prominent two storey bay windows with, directly above, large dormers in the roof slope. Arched openings to entrance lobbies. Window openings have segmental heads and 2 light sashes; all openings have brick keystones linking to string courses.

Briardale, Cauldwell Avenue

Late 19thc. 3 storey house. Red brick, modern concrete tile roof. Single storey bay window with tile roof.

36-46 Carr Street

1884-85. Architect. JE Goodey. No’s 36-46 was designed by James Goodey as Carr St Shops and Assembly Rooms in 1884 for the Ipswich Co-operative Society. Goodey was a notable regional architect who designed buildings for the Co-operative Society in London and Haverhill. This is a 3 storey Suffolk white brick commercial building, slate

mansard roof with cast iron railing. Features highly decorative brickwork to Carr Street and Cox Lane frontages. Stone string and dentilled eaves course. Slate roofed 6 turret to Cox Lane corner with lead finial. Carr St elevation - windows grouped 3, 4 and 3 with 1 window in pediment end. Right hand side 3 window range to turret, 2 light sashes. Cox Lane elevation – windows grouped 3, 1, 2 and 3 with similar pediment over single window. 4 and 16 light sashes with keystone feature to stone arched heads. Ground floor – modern shop fronts.

48-68 Carr Street (Co-operative)

1907-08 Architect: H.Winkworth. A three storey commercial frontage at the corner of Carr Street and Cox Lane. The frontage is curved at first and second floor levels. Suffolk white brick. Iron framed structure; at first floor level large plate glass windows (curved at the corner,) between pilasters which support a projecting cornice with consoles. The large panes are

divided by mullions in the form of thin columns; in the heads of the panes, strips of smaller lights, and the upper window corners are rounded. On the second floor, more conventional 2 light sash windows within ornamental painted stone frames, divided by pilasters; above, a dentilled cornice and above that a parapet with decorative round and triangular gables. The corner features the inscription ‘Each for All and All for Each’ (associated with the co-operative movement) and the date 1909. Modern shop fronts on the ground floor.

13 Cauldwell Avenue

Late 19thc. 2 storey residential, semi detached. Red brick, stone dressings. Slate roof. Central doorway between bay windows, continuous slate roofed canopy over bays and bridging between them to form a porch over the doorway. Above, 3 sash windows with narrow glazed margin lights. Ornamental stone lintels on brackets over window heads.

Craigerne, Cauldwell Avenue

Late 19thc. 2 storey detached house. Red brick, stone dressings. Asymmetric entrance frontage comprising a number of individually expressed elements; the entrance is a four centred arch in the side of a large 2 storey bay window. To the east, a projecting wing with an oriel window angled towards the main driveway. To the west a section of frontage is given additional height by a stepped parapet and carved stone finial. Further west is a projecting bay with an inset stone tablet. Window openings reinforce the irregular composition, further emphasised by string courses that step up and down around façade

elements. In the bay at ground floor level, a large square headed window with hood mould over. The windows have a distinctive mullion and transom design with triangular uncusped mouldings. 3 clustered tudor-style chimney stacks.

115 Cauldwell Hall Road

1874. 2 storey detached. Suffolk white brick, slate roof, 2 chimneys. Decorative brick string course at first floor level. Modern brick front wall. 3 window range. Brick lintels over 6 light sash windows. Semi circular brick arch framing fan light over original 4 panelled door.

173 – 177 Cauldwell Hall Road

Mid 19th century. 2 storey terrace. Flint with red brick quoins, string course and window surrounds. Slate roof. Modern doors to 173 and 175. 6 window range, some glazing bars removed from 175.

Stables and Bakery, Ipswich Co-op Society, Cauldwell Hall Road

1896. Architect: Eade and Johns. The double gabled stable frontage has a large central door (now fitted with a modern roller shutter) between white brick pilasters; the large plain gabled bays are to either side of this. The left hand gable has an original entrance between segmental headed windows with metal glazing bars. Right hand entrance is blocked. Red brick with

white brick quoins and slate roof. Above, in both gables, original loading doors at first floor level set between windows and a louvered panel, the whole grouped under depressed white brick arches with keystones.

St Johns Vicarage, Cauldwell Hall Road

Early 20th c. 2 storey detached house, hipped roof. Red brick, stone dressings, clay tile roof. 2 chimneys. 3 bay frontage with projecting central entrance bay under a prominent projecting gable, the central gable further emphasised by horizontal stripes of brick and stone at ground level and oriel window above. Entrance is offset with flat canopy above. Heavy stone string course, and quoins of single course stone strips alternating with brick.

52 Chevallier Street

Probably 1882. 2 storey detached house. Red brick, slate roof, red clay ridge cap. Decorative pierced brick boundary wall. Gate piers. 4 window range. 2 light sashes. Pediment feature over central entrance and first floor window, triple window to either side on the ground floor. Paired windows to first floor window.

Clarkson Street Free Church

1874. Architect: Cattermole and Eade. Pitch roofed church at junction of Clarkson Street and Wilberforce Street. Red brick, Suffolk white brick and stone dressings. North entrance elevation has an offset entrance porch, gabled, reached up steps. Stone lintel over door and white brick roundel in gable. The central bay of the elevation has stepped buttresses to either side, triple twocentre arched lancet windows under hood moulds at ground floor level, prominent rose window in the main gable with stone plate tracery. Arched lancets between stepped buttresses on the side elevation, taller paired lancets in the shallow side transepts. The form and scale of the church is sensitive yet bold and it effectively punctuates the street corner in contrast to the smaller domestic scale of the surrounding buildings.

Clifford Road Primary School

1905. Architect: Eade and Johns. This building has a long site plan occupying almost the full length of the Clifford Road frontage. Red brick with ashlar dressings. Clay tile roof. The single storey frontage is varied with tall window groups projecting above the roofline as square headed dormers, and gables with broad, segmental-headed mullioned windows. A single large gable projects forward and is further emphasised by battered buttresses.

The Royal George, Colchester Road

Early 20thC. Large detached public house, at the junction of Colchester Road and Sidegate Lane. 2 storey. Red brick, clay roof and wall tiles. The main elevation is to Colchester Road; further ranges to the north and west, forming open courtyard spaces.

90 Constable Road

1902. Architect: H. Leighton. Detached 2 storey house with attic. Red brick, painted render, clay tile roof. Ground floor elevations in brick, first floor rendered. Large gabled dormer to front. 2 chimney stacks.

91 Constable Road

1902. Architect: H. Wright. 2 storey detached house. Painted render, clay tile roof. Chimney stack. Porch with flat roof. 2 storey bay window under projecting timber framed pediment.

93 Constable Road

1903. Architect: JA. Sherman. 3 storey (including attic) detached house. Red brick, stone dressings, clay tile roof. Central doorway within stone frame, between 2 storey bay windows with pyramidal tiled roofs. Large gabled dormer . Four chimney stacks.

100 & 102 Constable Road

1906. Architect: WH Catchpole. 3 storey (including attic) semi detached houses , forming a pair. Red brick, painted stone dressings, clay tile roof. Entrances are twinned under a tiled porch roof between two storey gabled bay windows at either end of the main façade. Square headed sash windows with divided lights in the upper panes. Decorative timber work in the bay gables. Twinned flat roofed dormer.

103 Constable Road

1903. Architect: J. Wood. 2 storey detached house. Red brick, painted stone dressings, slate roof. Entrance door has margin lights and lintel with heavily modelled cornice; the detail repeats on the bay. Two storey bay window with pyramidal roof. Sash window with divided upper panes. Original brick gateposts and wall. Black and white diamond pattern clay tile path and step.

104 & 106 Constable Road

1907. Architect: WH Catchpole. 3 storey (including attic) semi detached houses, forming a pair. Round arched entrances twinned under a tiled porch roof between 2 storey bay windows at either end of the main façade. Sash windows have divided upper panes. Gabled dormer windows with finials are directly above the bays.

108 & 110 Constable Road

1907. Architect: WH Catchpole. 3 storey (including attic) semi detached houses, forming a pair. Round arched entrances twinned under a tiled porch roof between 2 storey bay windows at either end of the main façade. Openwork cast iron brackets to porch eaves, and central cast iron support post. Sash windows have divided upper panes. Gabled dormer windows with finials are directly above the bays.

116 Constable Road

1911. Architect: EH Coller. 2 storey detached house. Half hipped roof. Red brick, concrete tile roof (not original). 2 storey gabled bay windows at either end of the main frontage; between, a single pitch roofed porch supported on 9 ornamental timber posts. Bays have segmental headed windows on the ground floor, decorative timberwork in the gables. 2 brick chimney stacks.

124 Constable Road

1910. Architect: J. Wood. Detached house, in an Arts and Crafts style. L-shaped plan with entrance formed by 2 storey flat roofed bay at junction of the two wings. Rendered with brick pilasters. Mullioned windows with leaded lights.

Constantine Road Bus Depot

Early 20th century. Bus shed and attached offices. Iron framing, red brick, Suffolk white brick and stone dressings, slate roof coverings. The bus shed is a triple pitch structure with 3 vehicle entrances onto Constantine road, one under each gable. Exposed iron lintel. In each gable, segmental headed and circular window openings within ornamental stone and brick frames.

69 Corder Road

1912-13. Architect: Col. HR Hooper. Detached 2 storey house. Rendered. Clay tile pyramidal roof. Single chimney stack. Projecting bay with gable. Flat roofed glazed porch. Single storey bay to one side, sloping roof.

74 Corder Road

1908. Architect: HS.Watling. Detached house. 2 storey detached house with large attics. Rendered, clay tile roof covering. Symmetrical garden elevation. Deep eaves with 2 storey corner bays connected by an open balcony. Six window attic dormer flanked by large square chimneys.

75 Corder Road

1912-13. Architect: Colonel HR.Hooper. Detached house. Rendered, pyramidal clay tile roof with deep eaves. Single tall chimney. Large side dormer. On the main elevation, entrance is recessed within a broad segmental arched porch. 2 storey bay window. Prominent string course. Above the entrance, a two sided oriel window.

84-88 Corder Road

1909. Architect: HS.Watling. Detached houses. Rendered exterior, concrete tile pyramidal roofs, single chimney stack. 86 and 88 have recessed entrance porches, 88 with a broad segmental arch over.

90 Corder Road

Early 20th century. Detached house. Rendered exterior, concrete tiled pyramidal roof with two angles of pitch and deep eaves . Recessed entrance; square headed porch supported on a corner post. Oriel window above. 2 storey bay window under gable. 2 chimneys.

92 Corder Road

Early 20th century. Detached house. Rendered exterior, concrete tiled pyramidal roof with two angles of pitch and deep eaves . Recessed entrance; square headed porch supported on a corner post. Oriel window above. 2 storey bay window under gable. 2 chimneys.

96 Corder Road. Early 20th century. Rendered exterior, hipped clay tile roof. 2 chimneys. Single storey bay with tile roof is positioned at the corner of the house facing the gateway: originally the entrance?

The Cricketers, Crown Street

1930s. Architect. JS Corder. Public house, built by brewers Tolly Cobbold as one of a series. The buildings project a corporate image, and have come to be known collectively as ‘Tollys Follys’. ‘The Cricketers’ is designed in an Elizabethan style reflecting the nearby Christchurch Mansion. Red 10 brick. Stone plinth. Painted stone dressings. Clay tile roof covering. Timber clock tower with copper pyramidal roof.

2 – 46 Devonshire Road

1905. Architect EH Coller. An early example of public housing constructed by the Council. The requirement stemmed from the Tramways Act 1900 which required the provision of replacement housing where road widening for tramways had taken place. The properties were unpopular at the time because of the terraced design set at the back of the pavement with no front gardens. Red brick, slate roofs. Ground floor window and door openings are segmental headed, the windows with thin keystone mouldings which overlap the string course.

Loch Fyne 1-3 Duke Street

Early 20th century. Former electricity substation. Steel framed structure. Red brick, metal framed windows. Slate roof. The main hall has a clerestory. Curved frontage to the main road junction.

The Royal Oak, Felixstowe Road

1882. Architect: TW Cotman. Public house. Red brick. Clay tiled roof, tile hanging. Half hipped roofs. Decorative timber panelling under gables. Two chimneys. 2 storey bay window on entrance front.

The Crown, Felixstowe Road

1930s . Public house, built by brewers Tolly Cobbold as one of a series with distinctive shared features such as clock towers. The buildings project a corporate image, and have come to be known collectively as ‘Tollys Follys’. Red brick painted stone dressings. Clay tile roof coverings. The building is designed in an Elizabethan style, with projecting bays capped with shaped gables.

The Railway, Foxhall Road

1870s. 2 storey public house, detached. Originally built as The Railway Hotel. Red brick, main frontage rendered and painted. Pitched slate roof concealed behind parapet. 2 chimney stacks, at either end of the roof pitch. The long symmetrical street frontage is positioned opposite the entrance to Derby Road and is visible from the entrance to Derby Road railway station (opened 1877).

158 Foxhall Road

Former Hope House Orphanage. 1882. Architect: William Eade. Two storey red brick, clay tile roof with attics in Queen Anne style.

St Clements Hospital, Foxhall Road

1868-70 Architect: William Ribbans. In 1867 The Corporation agreed to build the Ipswich Borough Asylum initially for 120

patients on 52 acres of land. It was opened in 1870 to provide “fit and sufficient” provision for those of unsound mind under the requirements of the Lunatic Asylums Act 1858. Built in a grand architectural manner common to public buildings of the

time the buildings consist of two parallel ranges; a very long south facing garden frontage (4 storeys) and a north facing 2 storey frontage. Built in red brick with Suffolk white brick quoins, stone dressings and a slate roof. The entrance frontage is restrained consisting of shallow projecting bays with quoins, stone bay windows.

14 &16 Freehold Road

1851 on gable plaque and initials ‘JTS’. Flint with red brick quoins, string course and window surrounds. Red clay tile roof with terra cotta ridge. Decorative bargeboard to 2 gables. Builder: John Trigg Scrivener. The plot formed part of the Freehold Land Society’s first land acquisition.

63 Gainsborough Road

1909-10. 2 storey detached house, mirrored with no.65. Narrow gabled frontage to Gainsborough Road, bay window at ground floor level, single window above. A prominent string course divides the red brick ground floor from rendered and painted upper floor.

65 Gainsborough Road

1909-10. 2 storey detached house, mirrored with no.63. Narrow gabled frontage to Gainsborough Road, bay window at ground floor level, single window above. Small plaque bearing the number 65 in the gable. A prominent string course divides the red brick ground floor from rendered and painted upper floor. Slate roof, red brick chimney. Side entrance door. The long side elevation has a projecting wing at its midpoint . This and 63 are the work of local architect Edward Henry Coller.

135 Henley Road

1899. 2 storey detached house. Architect, JS Corder. L-shaped plan with gable to main road frontage. Gable has brick base and structural timber framed upper floor, projecting from the front on corbels with a single first floor bay window. 2 tall brick chimney stacks on north side. Return wing has, towards the road frontage, a roof plane extending down to ground floor eaves height, covering a glazed entrance porch, timber framed double dormer with brick nogging above. Side and garden frontages are rendered and painted.

Sparrows Nest Lodge, Henley Road

Early 19th century (same period as main house). Single storey, almost square plan. Hipped slate roof is almost pyramidal in

form, with gault brick chimney at its apex. Elevations are painted render, probably over gault brick. Entrance door with (modern addition?) trellis porch to south elevation, between sash windows with glazing bars. Two original window openings, also sash, on west elevation; the other sides have single storey extensions.

Castle Hill Community Centre, Highfield Road

Substantial 19th century detached house, possibly of more than one period. On or near to the site of a Roman villa. 2

storey, asymmetrical grouping, the main block at an angle to the main road frontage 12 (originally facing Norwich Road across gardens). On its north side a lower block.

Springfield Junior School, Kitchener Road

Board school. 1896. Architect, Bisshopp and Cautley. Red brick, slate roofs. Positioned at the junction of Bramford Lane and Kitchener Road, with long classroom ranges to both street frontages, set behind a low brick wall with original railings. A third range runs at right angles to the rear of the Bramford Lane block, enclosing the iron framed assembly hall. The

classroom range frontages are a series of projecting gables and recessed bays, enclosing tall window openings with transoms and mullions and glazing bars, the lower panes with sliding sashes. In the recessed bays, the windows form pitch roofed

dormers through the slope of the roof. The most prominent gable, at the road junction, has the Ipswich Corporation arms and the name ‘Springfield School’ carved in the brickwork. Several tall brick chimney stacks are set along the roof ridge of the

classroom ranges.

99 Lacey Street. Morpeth House

Detached late 19th century villa, 2 storey frontage to Lacey Street, 3 storey addition to the rear under a double pitched roof. Lower extension on east side. Grey gault brick main elevation, with stone dressings over windows and entrance door. Slate roof. The side elevations and rear extension are red brick with yellow stock brick and stone dressings and string course.

102 Lacey Street

Late 19th century industrial building. Rectangular, 2 storeys, 6 bays. Red brick, rendered and painted on the main elevation. Set back from Lacey Street behind a rendered brick wall and a ramp to the basement level. The first floor of the street elevation has tall round headed window openings within round arches rising from ground level. Rectangular basement windows. Original metal frames.

Rushmere Primary School, Lanark Road

1949. Primary school. Architect: Johns, Slater and Haward. Rushmere was Birkin Haward’s first school project. Loose, linear

plan, designed for infants and juniors. Steel framed and brick construction. Classrooms are ranged in long lines either side of central service spines, each classroom provided with a small courtyard for outdoor classes linked by folding windows. The school won a Festival of Britain Merit award in 1951.

38-44 London Rd

1864. 3 storey residential terrace, set back from London Road and arranged in a 3 sided crescent, the end bays projecting forward and emphasised by 2 storey bay windows and gables. White brick with red brick ornamentation. Low pitched roofs. 38 and 44 slate, 40 and 42 tiled. Sash windows on 1st and 2nd floors and semi-circular arched casement dormers on 3rd except in end gables where similar design casement is above 2 storey bay windows. String courses between windows, 38 and 44 have entrances at north and south end of terrace respectively under semi-circular arches, 40 and 42 have semi-circular arched porches facing

road, all with steep steps up. Original panelled doors.

Westbridge Pupil Referral Unit, 72-76 London Road

1874. Former infants school. Architect: Brightwen Binyon. Single storey building at the corner of London Road and Wilberforce Street. U-shaped ground plan with two long frontages to the street. Ornamental mix of red and Suffolk white brick on the main elevations, slate roofs. Intact schoolyard wall to London Rd is made of alternating bands of red and white bricks. Large gables are spaced along the main frontages, containing tall paired arched window openings grouped under shallow super-arches; in the spandrels red brick roundels with terracotta insets. Between the gables, square headed sash windows with glazing bars. The facades are enlivened by the brickwork colour contrasts and decorative coursing, for instance under the eaves. The modern

unit is concealed behind the Victorian wings.

81-83 London Road ‘Oriel Cottages’

1849. 3 storey pair of semi detached cottages. Flint with red brick quoins and window surrounds. Tiled roofs on cottage

and porches, ornamental barge boards and pointed timber finial on gable end and porches. 2 chimneys. 2 window range, 1 wide triple sash window in 1st and 1 on ground floor and single divided window in gable end facing London Road.

111 London Road

Before 1849. 2 storey detached house. Suffolk white brick on red brick plinth. Hipped slate roof and dentil cornice. 3 chimneys. Cellar. 2 window range, 16 light sashes. Entrance at north side. White painted lintels over all windows.

136 London Road ‘Lansdowne Villa’

After 1849. 2 storey detached house. Attic and basement. Knapped flintwork, Suffolk white brick quoins. Modern concrete tile

roof with carved barge board painted red. Ornate chimney stack. Modern windows, 3 on 1st floor & 2 small attic slit windows, 1 in gable end and 1 in dormer at right end of building over bay window on ground floor. Central front door in Suffolk white brick with castellated parapet. Band of white painted trefoil shaped tiles above ground floor windows. Suffolk white brick garden wall.

Lower Orwell Street Boundary Marker

Stone plaque carved ‘St C + B’ in serifed lettering (dark colour applied to the carved surfaces).

2-6 Luther Road.

Former almshouses. 1895. Architect: Binyon Brightwen. 2 storey block with a pitched roof, scaled to fit in with the surrounding streets of 19th century red brick terraced housing. Red brick, white painted timberwork, slate roof. The long

frontage to Luther Road steps up the hill; the roofline is broken by a centrally placed gable with an inscribed stone plaque below (within a pedimented brick frame) and a round arched opening at ground level. To either side of this, at ground floor level the recessed entrance doors to apartments reached up steps with timber handrails, between shallow segmental arched window openings.

14 Marlborough Road

1911. Architect: JA Sherman. 2 storey gabled detached house. T-shaped plan, projecting wing to rear. Red brick ground floor, painted render at first floor level. 3 bay street frontage with projecting central bay under a gable.

140-2 Nacton Road

1900-01. Architect: TW Cotman. 3 cottage group, 2 storey, prominently positioned at the junction of Nacton Road and Clapgate Lane. Single gabled block, with roofs sloping to first floor level and artfully designed around attic dormers, cut backs and outshuts. Concrete roof tiles (probably replacing original clays), Flemish bonded brickwork alternating red stretchers with blue headers. Black and white timberwork in gables. On the elevation facing the junction, a 2 storeyed gabled bay and below a horizontal window group of 2 rectangular lights either side of a central plaster panel bearing the date ‘1901’. Irregularly grouped casement window openings, variety of sizes, some segmental headed.

2 Newsome Street

1868. 2 storey terrace. Property is the return view from Newsom Street of 48 Orford Street – part of a terrace. Suffolk white brick, slate roof. Symmetrical frontage to Newsom Street; doorway is set centrally within a double order round headed arch with keystone and imposts, semi circular fanlight above.

St Bartholomews Vicarage, Newton Road

1897. Architect: CS Spooner. 2 storey detached vicarage, L-shaped plan, set back from the main road in a garden plot

alongside the church of St Bartholomew’s. Red brick, clay tile roof, hanging tiles in the gables. The style is Arts and Crafts.

2 North Hill Road ‘Allen House’

Later 19th century. 2 storey gabled detached house. L-shaped plan, set back from the road behind a red brick garden wall. Red

brick, slate roof. Ornamental bargeboards to gable ends. Symmetrical front elevation; centrally placed doorway with fanlight under heavily modelled circular stone arch and keystone (painted). Arch imposts have foliage panels and the arch bears the inscription ‘Allen House’. Round headed window directly above has almost identical arch modelling, without the keystone. To either side of the door, three light windows with heavy stone mullions and framing, the lintels formed into shallow

pediments. Upper floor windows have stone lintels on brackets and cills.

77 Norwich Road. Rose and Crown Public House

18th c. or earlier. 3 storey, forms part of a group prominently sited at the junction of Norwich road and Bramford Lane. Red brick with rendered façade painted cream. Slate roof. 3 window range, 12 15 light sashes, 3 window openings in second floor blocked up. 19th c entrance porch and ground floor bay joined by cornice. 2 brick chimney stacks.

306 Norwich Road

1881. 2 storey detached house, paired with no.308. Red brick with Suffolk white brick quoins. Hipped slate roofs. 4 chimneys. Double fronted 3 window range. 12 light sashes with triple ground floor windows.

331 - 335 Norwich Road

1899. 2 storey detached houses, gable ends facing road. Suffolk white brick facades, red brick to sides and rear. Slate roof. 2 chimneys. Broad street frontage divided between a 2 storey bay with slate roof and recessed front door under a round keystone arch.

332 Norwich Road

After 1882. 2 storey and basement semi detached house, paired with no.334. Red brick and Suffolk white facades, red brick sides and rear. Low pitched hipped slate roofs, common chimney. Small bay with arch headed window on ground floor supported on corbels over basement windows. 2 window range, 12 light sash windows. Flat string course runs through first floor window cills. 9 steps leading up to front doors under plain arches. Suffolk white brick garden walls.

625 Norwich Road. ‘Whitton White House Lodge’

1850. Single storey elevation to main road; to the rear a basement level is inserted into the slope. Suffolk white brick,

red brick rear. Hipped slate roof, at the rear modified into a double pitch with chimney stacks on each ridge. Broken pediment over doorway contains a circular window; the doorway is original with glazed panels inserted. 2 window range 4 light sashes. 2 casement windows at rear.

46 Palmerston Road

1881. Architect: J. Butterworth. 2 storey end terrace. Extension to rear. Red brick (painted on side and rear), slate roof. Stone dressings to window and door openings. 3 bay frontage with central doorway under stone pediment moulding. Flat roofed bay windows to either side, 2 light sashes.

7 Queenscliffe Road

Late 19thc. Substantial 3 storey detached house, set in its own grounds. Double depth plan with the grander elevation towards the garden. Red brick, clay tile roofs. Entrance under a sloping roofed porch. Towards the garden, a tiled roofed verandah turns the corner of the main block. 2 storey bay window on the garden frontage. Dormers on principle elevations, and prominent brick chimney stacks. Windows are sliding sash with fixed four light panes above.

11 Queenscliffe Road

Early 20thc. 2 storey gabled detached house. Brick (painted), clay tile roofs. Projecting gable eaves towards the road supported on curving brackets. Brick porch on north side, hipped dormer above. Detached double garage.

Ranelagh Road Primary School

1906. Architect: JA Sherman. Large single storey school, red brick with stone dressings. Designed to accommodate boys, girls and infants separately. The variety of hall and schoolroom spaces are articulated externally by prominent gables in a northern european renaissance style. These step up the slope, and are set forwards or to the rear in relation to the street frontage; the varied articulation is unified by the strong horizontal stone banding which runs across wall surfaces and through window mullions and chimney stacks. Tall square headed window openings are grouped in stepped arrangements under gables and dormers 16 with stone lintels, and a cill formed from one of the stone bands. 4 light sashes under fixed panes with glazing bars. The gables are ornate; stone shoulder corbels, stepped mouldings.

Montrose, Rosehill Crescent

1905. Architect: Eade and Johns. Large 3 storey detached house, in a mature garden setting. Red brick, slate roof tiles. Rectangular ground plan, hipped roof. The garden facing west elevation is symmetrical; 2 story flat roofed bays at either end of the broad frontage, 3 window bays between and a modern timber terrace (plastic panels in roof).

5 Rosehill Road ‘Parkside’

19th century. 2 storey detached house. Red brick, slate roofs. Rectangular, double pile plan, hipped valley roof. Symmetrical elevation to Rosehill Road; narrow projecting central bay with square headed doorway and hall light with decorative glazing bar detail, between brick pilasters which rise the full height of the bay and support a plain pediment at roof level.

Rosehill Library

Early 20thc. 2 storey detached library building. Domestic scale; gabled roof, the eaves extending to first floor level. A flat roofed single storey extension has been added to the rear. Red brick, painted render, clay tile roof. The entrance elevation to Tomline Road has a centrally placed doorway between three light rectangular window openings.

161 Rosehill Road

1880. 2 storey detached house, former Methodist manse associated with the adjoining church and school site. Domestic scale, set back from the road behind a garden (red brick garden wall), matching neighbouring terraced housing and the church and school buildings. Red brick, Suffolk white brick and stone dressings, slate roof. Street facing frontage is divided into two bays by pilasters at the corners and the middle of the elevation; in each bay, single storey brick bay windows with stone bases and lintels and slate roofs, and above paired second floor windows with keystoned arched heads. Sliding sash windows.

110 Rushmere Road

1909. 2 storey detached house. Pitched roof with gable over central bay on street elevation. Extensions to rear under 2 separate pitches. Red brick ground floor, textured render (unpainted) to first floor. Clay tile roof. Main elevation has projecting central doorway with, against its upper half, canted windows to either side and a flat canopy on ornamental brackets. Leaded glazing.

112 Rushmere Road

1909. 2 storey detached house. Partner to No.110. Pitched roof with gable over central bay on street elevation. Extension to rear under a separate pitch. Red brick ground floor, textured render (unpainted)to first floor. Clay tile roof. Main elevation has projecting central doorway with, against its upper half, canted windows to either side and a flat canopy on ornamental brackets.

114 Rushmere Road ‘Kingston Lodge’

(1909). 2 storey detached house. Flat topped pyramidal roof over square ground plan, the street frontage broadened to allow for two prominent gables with terracotta finials, recessed slightly behind the projecting eaves. Red brick ground floor, textured render (unpainted) to first floor. Clay tile roof. Projecting timber framed porch in middle of main elevation, glazed front door and arch headed light above with ‘Kingston Lodge’ etched into the glass, narrow round headed lights to either side and on the return sides of the porch.

115 Rushmere Road

(1909). 2 storey detached house. Flat topped pyramidal roof over square ground plan, the street frontage broadened to allow for two prominent gables with terracotta finials, recessed slightly behind the projecting eaves. Red brick ground floor, textured render (unpainted) to first floor. Clay tile roof. Projecting timber framed porch in middle of main elevation, glazed front door and arch headed light above, narrow round headed lights to either side and on the return sides of the porch.

116 Rushmere Road ‘The Limes’

(1909). 2 storey detached house. Flat topped pyramidal roof over square ground plan, the street frontage broadened to allow for two prominent gables with terracotta finials, recessed slightly behind the projecting eaves. Red brick ground floor, textured render (unpainted) to first floor. Clay tile roof. Projecting timber framed porch in middle of main elevation, glazed front door and arch headed light above with ‘The Limes’ etched into the glass, narrow round headed lights to either side and on the return sides of the porch.

117 Rushmere Road

1909. 2 storey detached house. Flat topped pyramidal roof over square ground plan, the street frontage broadened to allow for two prominent gables with terracotta finials, recessed slightly behind the projecting eaves. Red brick ground floor, textured render (unpainted) to first floor. Clay tile roof.

121 Rushmere Road

1908. Architect: Henry Buxton. Partner to no.123. 2 storey detached house. Pitched roof. Red brick, concrete tiled roof (originally slate). Symmetrical 3 bay elevation to street, under projecting eaves and a deep triangular pediment, in timber and both emphasised with dentils. Pediment has a brick tympanum and a blank keystoned oculus with the date ‘1908’.Terracotta finial on the pediment apex.

123 Rushmere Road

1908. Architect: Henry Buxton. Partner to no.121. 2 storey detached house. Pitched roof. Red brick, slate roof. Symmetrical 3 bay elevation to street, under projecting eaves and a deep triangular pediment, in timber and both emphasised with dentils. Pediment has a brick tympanum and a blank keystoned oculus with the date ‘1908’.Terracotta finial on the pediment apex. Brick quoins either side of the main elevation, emphasised by projecting bricks every fourth course.

222 Rushmere Road

Early 20th century. 2 storey detached house. Rectangular plan, long elevation to street frontage. Pitched roof, gable on street elevation (offcentre) with roof plane sloping to either side to first floor eaves level. Painted render, black stained timber window / door frames and structural framing. Clay roof tiles.

226 Rushmere Road

Early 20th century. 2 storey terraced row positioned at the junction of Rushmere Road and Humber Doucy Lane. Pitched roof. Long ground plan follows the curve of the road junction, with a cross gable at the Rushmere Road end. Frontages are set back from the road edge behind shallow front gardens. Similar style and detail to No.222 Rushmere Road. Painted render, black stained timber window / door frames and structural framing. Clay rooftiles.

Ship Launch Inn, Ship Launch Road

c.1860. 2 storey. Suffolk white brick and slate roof. Brick parapet wall to corner of Cliff and Ship Launch Road frontages. Single storey flat roof addition in Suffolk white brick with ornamental panels to Cliff Road frontage. 4 window range to Cliff Road, 3 window range on return. 2 windows to Cliff Road blocked up. 16 light sash windows and part glazed door to Ship Launch

frontage. Group value with 1 & 2 Ship Launch Cottages.

42 Sidegate Lane West. Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints

1950s / 1960s. Modern church, church hall and community rooms in adjoining single storey blocks. The church has a single pitch roof supported on reinforced concrete beams, orientated north-south with eaves reaching to first floor height. Gables are angled outwards towards their apex.

10-18 Smart Street, former Smart Street School

(1881-82) Architect: Brightwen Binyon. Board school. L-plan storey group at the corner of Smart Street and Pleasant Row. Red brick, Ancaster stone dressings, terracotta panels, slate roof. Varied street elevations with projecting gabled bays, the north west entrance bay with a straight parapet and ornamental stone machicolation course. Segmental arched window

openings at ground floor level, recessed arched doorways with stone hood moulds.

530 Spring Road

19thc. 2 storey end terraced house. Pitched roof at right angles to the street behind brick parapet. Suffolk white brick, slate tiled roof. Segmental doorway with light above. Ground floor bay window (heavily modified) 2 segmental arched window openings above. Door and window openings have decorative brick voussoirs. Parapet also has decorative brick mouldings and cornice.

532 Spring Road

19thc. 2 storey terraced house. Pitched roof at right angles to the street behind brick parapet. Suffolk white brick, slate tiled roof. Doorway with segmental arch and keystone, and hall light above. Ground floor brick bay window with sloping, tiled roof supported on decorative brick cornice. 2 segmental arched 20 window openings above. Door and window openings have decorative brick voussoirs. Parapet also has decorative brick mouldings and cornice.

534 Spring Road

19thc. 2 storey terraced house. Pitched roof at right angles to the street behind brick parapet. Suffolk white brick, slate tiled roof. Doorway with segmental arch and keystone, and hall light above. Ground floor brick bay window with sloping, tiled roof supported on decorative brick cornice. 2 segmental arched window openings above. Door and window openings have decorative brick voussoirs.

536 Spring Road

19thc. 2 storey end terraced house. Pitched roof at right angles to the street behind brick parapet. Suffolk white brick, slate tiled roof. Doorway with segmental arch and keystone, and hall light above. Ground floor brick bay window with sloping, tiled roof supported on decorative brick cornice. 2 segmental arched window openings above. Door and window openings have decorative brick voussoirs.

Spring Road Viaduct

C1876. Yellow brick, 3 bays , brick panel feature to parapet. 11.5metre span, approx. 18 metre headroom. The 3 arch viaduct is the only significant structure on the Felixstowe Branch Line, constructed by the Felixstowe Railway and Pier Company and opened in 1877.

The Old times, Spring Road

2 storey public house, sited at the junction of Cauldwell Hall Road and Spring Road, the long elevation to the former. Set at the back of the pavement . The pitched roof has a hip over its short frontage to Spring Road. Painted brick, painted stone window cills and lintels, slate tiled roof. Domestic scaled frontage; the corner is chamfered. The pub fascia wraps the corner, supported on closely set pilasters which frame the window openings. Sash window openings at first floor level, moulded lintels. Blocked window on the corner is partly covered by the pub sign.

The Fat Cat, Spring Road

2 storey public house. Pitched roof. Timber fronted side extension with lean-to roof. Red brick, Suffolk white brick, painted timber. Concrete roof tiles (modern replacement). Timber panelled pub frontage three rectangular window lights and narrow doorway with fascia over. Sash window to one side with Suffolk white brick segmental arched head, and at the east end of the elevation a blocked former doorway. Two square headed windows to the first floor. The timber fronted extension has a glazed panel double door and a single unglazed door at ground level and large window above, set under the roof slope and divided by thin mullions.

Sprites Lane Junior School

(1960). Architect: Johns, Slater & Haward. Double height pavilions with hyperbolic roofs linked by lower flat roofed blocks and corridors. The arrangement is loose and designed to be set amongst lawns and mature trees. Buff brick, timber framed windows. Elevations are a mix of concrete capped brick plinth walls and glazing; some pavilion elevations are glazed to their full height (the glazing has been replaced with solid panels in some cases). All elements are slim and lightweight, including the angled fascias of the roof structures.

Zoar Baptist Church, St Helens Street

(1925). Church group at the junction of St Helens Street and Rope Walk. Gable roofed church with transepts and smaller gabled church hall set back and to one side. Red brick, blue headers, stone dressings, clay roof tiles. The main (north) church elevation facing St Helens Street is emphasised by a tall central bay set between buttresses with heavy stone finials,

which project beyond the slope of the roof.

9 St Johns Road

Early 20thc. 2 storey detached house. Hipped roof. 3 storey tower with stone parapet on the north (garden) side. Red brick, Suffolk white brick and painted stone dressings, concrete roof tiles (not original). Street frontage has an entrance recessed behind a round headed stone arch with keystone and decorative imposts. Ground floor bay window has an ornate painted stone cornice and tiled roof supported on columns with gothic capitals. Above, sash windows with projecting stone lintels on brackets. White brick quoins. 3 storey red brick tower forms a rear extension, overlooking the garden and visible from the street; attached to one side a prominent brick chimney with moulded panels.

1 - 40 Oaklee, Stoke Park Drive

1970s. Architect: Johns, Slater & Haward. Public housing scheme occupying mature landscaped grounds in the south west of Ipswich. The design provides a variety of housing types, mostly flats in 2 and 3 storey blocks but also terraced housing. Buff brick, stained timber, concrete roof tiles. The buildings are designed into the sloping site; blocks of flats run parallel with the contours, overlooking the valley; the double-depth blocks are stepped up the slope to the rear, the change in level expressed as a step along the roofline. Individual housing runs in terraces up the slope; units are paired under butterfly roofs, which step up the slope.

Stoke Bridge K6 Telephone Kiosk

An example of the K6 kiosk type produced in 1935 to commemorate the silver jubilee of King George V. This became the archetypal British kiosk design, used across the country.

Barton Wood, Stone Lodge Lane

Early 20th century. Detached house set in large mature landscaped grounds. Red brick. Clay tile roof, decorative clay ridge tiles, non structural timber framing on upper floors.

Tudor House, Stone Lodge Lane

Early 20th century. Detached house. Red and Suffolk white brick, timber framing, clay tile hipped roof. Centrally placed entrance door; the timber framed upper part of the bay projects on corbels. Diagonally laid brick nogging between the timbers. 2 brick chimney stacks.

Whitton Water Pumping Station, Thurleston Lane

1913. Formerly Ipswich Corporation Waterworks. Single storey building. Red brick with Suffolk white brick features. Clay tile roof. Clerestory roof light. Brick dentilled eaves. 7 window range, multi-light iron framed windows with brick arch and keystone heads. Windows set in red brick panels with white brick piers. Circular windows in gable ends. Panelled double central door with arched brick head and fanlight. Stone capping to gable ends, corbelled at eaves.

Thurleston Lodge Farm, Thurleston Lane

Late 19th century. Substantial detached house in its own grounds. Designed in an Elizabethan style. Red brick, stone quoins

and dressings, clay tile roof covering. Double depth house with cross wings to north and south, the larger to the south, garden-facing frontage. 2 storey bay windows, decorative brick chimney stacks.

Red House Farm, Tuddenham Road

c.1870. 3 storey detached house. Suffolk white brick with flint panels. Modern concrete tile roof. 2 modern chimneys. 5 window range, modern replacement sash windows. Centre range of 3 windows breaks forward under parapet. Modern flat roof dormer with 2 windows. Modern door with flat roofed porch supported on columns (columns are a modern addition).

103 Tuddenham Road

1910. Architect: J. Wood. Detached house. Red brick, painted render and timber framing. Clay tile roof covering. Symmetrical entrance frontage; timber framed porch with brick nogging, tiled roof and continuous glazing band under the eaves. Single storey bay windows to either side. Above the porch, around headed window with glazing bars. Upper floor and gables are vertically timbered.

253 Tuddenham Road Anti Tank Gun Emplacement

1940s In-situ concrete emplacement.

82 Victoria Street

C.1850. 2 storey, detached. Suffolk white brick, hipped slate roof. 2 chimneys. 3 window range 12 light sash windows, glazing bars removed on the ground floor. White painted pilastered surround to entrance door with rectangular fanlight over. Original panelled door. Glazed door inserted in window LHS, with 3 light fanlight over.

37-39 Wherstead Road

18-19c. 2 storey. Suffolk white brick façade (painted). Red clay tile roof. 2 window range, 16 light sashes. Early 20th c. shopfront.

541 Wherstead Road

1879. 2 storey detached. Suffolk white brick front, red brick sides, rear elevation rendered. Hipped late roof. 3 tall chimney stacks. 3 window range 4 & 6 light sashes set in brick relief panels. Brick pilasters to corners. Stucco lintels. Late 19th c. single storey extensions to sides and rear of red brick with tiled roofs. Modern red brick garden wall.

1 Willoughby Road

1864. Corner site, part 2 storey, part 3 storey, semi-detached. Slate roof. 2 chimneys. Suffolk white brick quoins, window surrounds & string course. Dentil eaves cornice repeated on parapets of 2 ground floor splayed bay windows either side of recess to front door. Timber pediment over semi-circular arched fanlight. 3 window range, 2 & 6 light sashes. French windows over bays. Small dormer. 2 window range with 1 ground floor bay window in return end to Belstead Road. Remains of wrought iron verandah, glazed roof removed and partly clad with metal sheeting.

2 Willoughby Road

1864. 3 storey semi-detached house with semi-basement. Red brick rendered and painted. Hipped slate roof. Small dormer with 4 light casement window. 2 window range, 2 & 6 light sashes with 6 light French window over ground floor bay window. Stone steps up to original panelled front door. Semi circular fanlight in arch over. Dentil eaves cornice repeated on parapet of bay. Situated on steep hill overlooking the town. Rendered garden wall.

3 & 4 Willoughby Road

1864. 3 storey semi-detached houses with semibasements. Red brick, hipped slate roof. Central chimney with original pots. Basement rendered & white colour washed. 4 window range 2 & 6 light sashes with original French windows over ground floor bay windows replaced with modern casements.

5 - 10 Willoughby Road

1864. 3 storey semi-detached houses. Similar to 3– 4. Nos. 7 – 10 have concrete tiled roofs. 5-9 have no roof dormers. basements and attics. Red brick. Slate roof. Large central chimney. Suffolk white brick quoins, pilasters, string courses and dentil course to parapet of 3 storey splayed bay window. 2 and 4 light sash windows, projecting stone cills on brackets to ground floor and first floor bay windows. Ornamental wrought iron rail on ground floor cills.

13 – 18 Willoughby Road

1864. Similar to 11 – 12 Willoughby Road. 13 has cills removed from ground floor and railings from first floor. 15 - cill railings removed from first floor. 14 - rendered and painted bay window.

19 Willoughby Road

1888. Architect: JS Corder. Detached house, 2 storey. Prominent location at the junction of Willoughby Road and Burrell Road. The picturesque asymmetry is partly a response to the change in level across the site, and the 360 degree views of the property from adjoining highways . Red brick, stone dressings, slate roof. The entrance frontage, facing the junction, is divided into three components which step up the slope; on the left, a gabled bay with prominent ground floor bay window and ornamental openwork barge boarding with finial. In the centre the doorway is set under a projecting stone porch supported on corbels and a single marble column with base and capital.

4 – 10 Withipoll Street

Late 19th c. 3 storey terrace. Red brick, originally slate roof covering, but largely replaced by concrete tiles. Terraces are paired; the arched entrances with keystones either side of a shared central pier. Linked lintels to first floor windows. On the ground floor, single storey bay windows with tiled roofs.

17 Withipoll Street

19th century. 2 storey terrace. Painted render, stone door and window lintels. Concrete tile replacement for original roof covering. Sash windows have margin lights.

The Case is Altered, Woodbridge Road

Early 20th century. Public house, on a prominent corner site. Red brick, painted render upper floor, clay tile roof covering.

The corner of the L-shaped block is chamfered to create the entrance with an oriel window above. On the main frontage, a 2 storey bay window with gable above; on the long side elevation 2 smaller gables.

206 Woodbridge Road

Before 1849. End of terrace. Painted Suffolk white brick façade to red brick building. Slate roof. 1 chimney. 2 window range, sashes. Some glazing bars removed. 19th c. shop front on pavement line. Modern door and ground floor window in original rear access.

49 Woodbridge Road, ‘The Limes’

1864. 2 storey detached. Suffolk white brick front to rendered red brick building. Slate roof. 2 chimneys. 3 window range. Originally sashes. 4 light casement replacements. Heavy stone door and window surrounds, dentil eaves and string course. 2 window range in return elevations. Remains of low brick garden wall.

210 Woodbridge Road

Late 19thc. Detached house, 2 storey. Red brick, clay tile roof. Entrance door under four centred arch. To the left, a projecting bay with decorative brick quoins, and lintel over the 3 light ground floor window. To the right, a single storey bay window with tiled roof. Decorative timberwork and bargeboards to main and secondary gables.

St Helens Primary School, Woodbridge Road

1912. Architect: RC Wrinch. Large 2 storey school in Edwardian classical style. Red brick, clay tile hipped roof. Three pedimented gables to N elevation. Prominent copper ventilated turrets to roof.

St Marys RC Parish Hall Woodbridge Road

1826-38. Architect: William Mason. Suffolk white brick façade to red brick building. Transept was built first, with nave

(facing road) built later. Stone crosses and finials. Decorative brick arch features to front gable. Corner brick buttresses extended as pinnacles. Brick porch repeats feature with pointed arch doorway. Plain timber doors. Range of 4 lancet windows in right hand return wall overlooking courtyard. Original cast iron railings to boundary wall.

212 Woodbridge Road

Mid 19thc. Public house. 2 storey detached. Painted brick. Hipped slate roof with red clay finials. 3 red brick chimneys. 3 window range, central window blanked in. 12 light sashes, glazing bars removed from ground floor window. Original timber pub front on pavement line. One window range in return wall.

418 Wyncroft, Woodbridge Road

Late 19thc. Detached house. 3 storey including attic. Red brick, clay tile roof. L-shaped plan with more extensive ground floor level covered by extended roof slopes. Irregular composition with 2 storey bay windows, decorative timberwork in the gables and a timber porch on the north east side. Sash windows with divided upper panes. 1 tall brick chimney stack.

3 comments

  • I'm sure that this isn't the first time that this list has been published, as a friend of mine lives in one of the properties concerned and his house was mentioned a couple of years ago. But perhaps that was a draft list and this is the substantive version. There is always a balance to be struck between "preserving an environment" and "preventing development" - buildings do need to be seen within their wider context and not in isolation.

    Report this comment

    Baptist Trainfan

    Thursday, September 12, 2013

  • is this the complete list? it only goes up to the letter "C" - and what website address can this be viewed on?...another half-reported story from the local rag....

    Report this comment

    Chris Ward

    Wednesday, September 11, 2013

  • An exquiset piece of Mid Century archetecture has just been decimeted in Bixley Drive. Anywhere else that house would have been listed, now almost gone forever, tragic. It as only the intervention of the 20th Century Society that stopped the fantastic Birkin Hayward house at Nacton!

    Report this comment

    Mike Derruki

    Wednesday, September 11, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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