Overcast

Overcast

max temp: 14°C

min temp: 10°C

Search

Ipswich: Young people must skill up for jobs

16:02 22 February 2013

Alex Curling, assistant director of the UK Commission for Employment and Skills.

Alex Curling, assistant director of the UK Commission for Employment and Skills.

WITH the Institute for Public Policy Research predicting that youth unemployment could again go through the million mark this year, the government’s skills experts have offered an insight into which jobs are likely to offer the best chance of a long-term career.

shares

Alex Curling, assistant director of the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES), said: “We are in the middle of a mini baby boom, and we also have an ageing population, so it is a pretty safe bet that we shall need more teachers, as well as more healthcare workers.

“In both cases, it is crucial to think more widely than just one job description. As well as teachers, think teaching assistants. As well as doctors, think dentists, nurses, midwives, healthcare assistants and related professions like physiotherapists, optometrists and radiographers.”

The UKCES is a UK-wide social partnership between employers, trade unions and the public sector. It works to galvanise employers to improve the skills of their workforces and invest in skills, especially in vocational training, and enhance employment opportunities. The UKCES also publishes world-class research to understand long-term patterns and trends in employment and skills in the UK.

Alex explained how to identify what will be the jobs of the future. “Whatever the economic climate, there will always be jobs which will definitely be required. Of course these will change over time, and it is essential to be aware of current and future trends.

“For example, changes in the way we work and in the way companies buy in skills have led to an increase in the number of professional freelance managers and consultants.

“Scientists and engineers will continue to be in demand, and it is a fairly safe bet that we shall continue to need plenty of software developers. Getting skilled up for one of these is potentially a good move.

Alex added: “Jobs which we shall probably see declining in the UK range from typists to postal workers, those working on production lines and in mines and quarries and also some retail workers.

“Then there are jobs that are gambles – these are not sure-fire winners but they have the potential to be highly rewarding and interesting careers.

“Recessions can act a bit like bush fires – clearing away the deadwood of old, stagnant businesses to make way for young and ambitious ones to flourish. So if you think you have a business in you, now could be a great time to start up your own company.

“Some really exciting opportunities are already being offered by young businesses born in the depth of the recession. UKCES has conducted research showing that growing young companies are far more likely to be hiring and developing staff than their more established counterparts.

“There are a huge range of other ‘gambles’ ranging from dancers and orchestral musicians to biomedical engineers and nano-technologists.

“One thing is sure. In these uncertain times, the more skills and qualifications you have, and the more flexible your approach, the better your chance of having a good career.”

shares

0 comments

The female driver of the car was not injured but shaken.

A lorry reportedly failed to stop after colliding with a car on the A14 near the Wherstead turnoff.

From left to right: Moira Ely, Leah Fuller and Colin Ely presenting the cheque for £2,000 to St Elizabeth Hospice after Colin's bungee jump in July

An Ipswich landlady has vowed to follow in the footsteps of her extraordinary dad – and tackle a charity bungee jump for St Elizabeth Hospice.

Spooky costumes on the beach at Felixstowe to launch the Halloween walk for EACH

A charity walk will light up Felixstowe’s promenade with its Halloween theme when it takes place next month.

Police are appealing for witnesses after the burglary of the social club of a business premises in Ipswich.

Allison Heathcote and son James Heathcote at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, where she was treated after being shot five times in the Tunisia terror attacks.

A Felixstowe woman who was fighting for her life after the Tunisia beach attack in which her husband was killed has said she can only “vaguely recall” the massacre.

Andrew Renton takes his first public walk at a neuro conference with the help of Headway Physiotherapist Karen Hardy, left, and Acquired Brain Injury Support Worker Chloe Witton, right.

For most of us walking is a luxury too easily taken for granted.

Cars for sale at the roadside

Trading Standards experts have revealed the top 10 most frequent consumer complaints.

Mars

A physicist who worked on a high-resolution camera that sent images back from Mars has turned his hand to writing.

Fire crews were called to Fraser House in Museum Street, Ipswich after a suspected gas leak was reported

A road in Ipswich has been reopened after a suspected gas leak forced the evacuation of a three storey building this morning.

Should Britain do more?

The public reaction to Europe’s migration crisis has been deeply polarised, but should Britain do more to offer homes to Syrian refugees affected by civil war?

Most read

Most commented

Topic pages