Overcast

Overcast

max temp: 10°C

min temp: 9°C

Search

Kesgrave: Frustration as treasured cedar tree is set to be shortened

18:05 21 February 2013

Ray Burgess with one of the last remaining Cedars in Kesgrave. Suffolk Costal District Council are planning to remove approx 40 ft from the top of it

Ray Burgess with one of the last remaining Cedars in Kesgrave. Suffolk Costal District Council are planning to remove approx 40 ft from the top of it

Archant

A DISGRUNTLED man has voiced his concerns after council officers approved plans to shorten a treasured cedar tree.

A number of years ago Ray Burgess, of Carlton Road in Kesgrave, successfully applied for a preservation order to be put in place for a cedar tree outside his home.

But today, he spoke of his sadness after Suffolk Coastal District Council agreed the top of the tree could be lopped following a complaint from a neighbour of Mr Burgess.

Mr Burgess, 69, said: “Cedar trees have an important place in the history of Kesgrave and I am so disappointed and annoyed that this is going ahead, despite a preservation order that I secured many years ago.

“By cutting the top of the tree off, the council will stop people enjoying it from a distance. They will ruin this beautiful tree by cutting such a massive amount off the top of it.”

However, a spokesman for Suffolk Coastal District Council said the decision had been made after safety concerns were raised.

The spokesman said: “An application was submitted by Mr Burgess’ neighbour after discussions with our tree officer about what could be done to resolve the problems he was facing with a 20m-plus cedar tree in his garden which has a preservation order dating back 24 years that was initiated by Mr Burgess.

“It was agreed that about one-third of the tree could be lopped so as to end the dangers of bits of the tree falling down into this resident’s garden.

“The tree and the proposed works have been assessed by both our previous and current tree officer who both came to the same conclusion that the proposed works were a reasonable request.”

He said the work would allow the tree to “survive and prosper”, while also ensuring the safety of the applicant.

Mr Burgess’ neighbours declined to comment on the matter.

5 comments

  • I offer Mr Burgess my total support on this matter and am so sorry that a magnificent tree which has taken decades to grow, has to be decimated in this way. Sadly we seem to live in a world of tree haters these days. People whinge about their loss of light (minimal and to which they have no legal right(, subsidence (a temporary one dry summer fad) and an imagined danger from falling branches. Councils seem eager to become involved in these issues, and always side with the complainant with a 'compromise' of hacking off huge chunks of tree which forever damage its shape and profile. Nowadays many people just want sterile bits of lawn and patio with access to as much cancer-inducing sun as possible. What a shame Mr Burgess that these people don't notice ancient trees before they move near to them. My sympathies that this historic tree has to be butchered, it has stood the test of time, but councils are more powerful than God I'm afraid!

    Report this comment

    Jane Summerfield

    Thursday, February 21, 2013

  • How predictable. One complaint and the powers that be jump to attention like little toy soldiers. I'm assuming the tree was there when Mr Burgess's neighbour purchased the property, and that therefore heshe would have been aware of the Preservation order prior to purchase?

    Report this comment

    Suffolk Boy

    Thursday, February 21, 2013

  • Its a tree. Just plant another one. The should cut it down and use it for paper

    Report this comment

    the opinion man

    Thursday, February 21, 2013

  • 'Tel' subsidence is not a major problem at all. It was the last big panic when we had a couple of dry summers. Those that want trees removed and those that do the work will 'big up' subsidence for their own ends, but it is grossly oversold. These particular trees are not thirstly as an oak would be, and they look some distance from the properties. But sadly some people can't bear trees anywhere near them and the usual excuse is 'what if a branch fell on someone?'. Which is a bit like saying 'I must give up my car in case I have an accident'. How many people do you know who have had a tree branch fall on them - but the threat of a legal case in the future puts the fear of God into most government bodies. What a pity we can't enjoy these magnificent trees without someone having to complain.

    Report this comment

    Jane Summerfield

    Friday, February 22, 2013

  • if the lady did more research, she would find that subsidence is a major problem and trees are the main cause

    Report this comment

    tel

    Thursday, February 21, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

Work on one of the biggest new housing developments in Ipswich for years – creating more than 200 new homes – could get under way early next year.

A car which broke down on the Orwell Bridge this morning has now been moved by police.

A couple have thanked Ipswich Hospital for the care staff gave their premature twin nieces by ditching their wedding gift list and asking for donations for the neonatal unit instead.

Amid the maelstrom created by the Steve Wright murders in 2006 London gang violence erupted at a town nightclub and claimed the life of a young man.

Hundreds of readers have already backed the Ipswich Star’s campaign calling for a northern bypass – and it’s not too late to pledge your support.

Police are at the scene of a two-car crash in Bramford Road.

The police hunt for missing RAF gunner Corrie McKeague has been labelled “incompetent” by his mother, as an online campaign has raised more than £20,000 to hire a private investigator.

A new university course is being launched, in Ipswich, which supports people wanting to retrain in order to teach maths in schools.

A 77-year-old widow has told of the hurt and pain she has suffered after necklaces given to her by her husband were stolen from her home by the suspected gang of prolific burglars.

Suffolk children at risk of being taken into care could be offered “short breaks” away from their families to avoid more costly and disruptive long-term solutions.

Most read

Most commented

HOT JOBS

Show Job Lists

Topic pages

Streetlife

Newsletter Sign Up

MyDate24 MyPhotos24