Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 15°C

min temp: 10°C

Search

Liston: Move to mark village’s links to bloody uprising

12:00 20 June 2014

Bid to get monument to commerative Liston's connections to the Great Rising or Peasants' Revolt which took place 633 years ago. Pictured is Darren Clark.

Bid to get monument to commerative Liston's connections to the Great Rising or Peasants' Revolt which took place 633 years ago. Pictured is Darren Clark.

The sleepy west Suffolk village of Liston hardly seems like the ideal location for a bloody revolt. But around 630 years ago, the area would have been awash with angry locals protesting about an increase in taxes.

When local historian Darren Clarke started investigating the history of the village, near Long Melford, he found that the population had shrunk dramatically in the 1300s.

He discovered this was down to the Peasants’ Revolt or Great Rising as it is also known.

Along with a group of enthusiasts, Mr Clarke is now on a mission to get a monument erected near the church to mark Liston’s involvement in the major uprising, which was sparked by the Government’s attempts to collect unpaid poll taxes.

At the time, Simon Sudbury was the Archbishop of Canterbury and the government’s most senior official, so the insurgent peasants regarded him as one of the principal authors of their woes.

Mr Clarke said: “Once I looked into it, I realised how important the Peasant’s Revolt was in our area and Liston was the first place where men from this area gathered to join the uprising.

“Cheered by the news that great swathes of Essex and Kent were openly resisting the government, crowds of locals assembled at Liston on June 12, 1381. In the small village they destroyed the manor of Richard Lyons, a rich London Merchant with a dubious history of corruption allegations.

“In a lot of other places where events happened, there are monuments and we believe Liston should have something to show for its involvement in this important uprising.”

Villagers who are pushing for a monument recently undertook a 3.2-mile walk across the fields retracing the steps the protestors would have taken.

Mr Clarke added: “We are confident we can get the funding to get the monument up by next year and we intend to make the walk an annual event complete with medieval costumes.”

3 comments

  • West Suffolk village? Ahem... Look at any OS map and you'll see that Liston is very definitely on the "wrong" side of the Stour.

    Report this comment

    beerlover

    Friday, June 20, 2014

  • Whilst Liston may be within walking distance of Long Melford it is in fact across the River Stour and in Essex.

    Report this comment

    Keith Slater

    Friday, June 20, 2014

  • Sorry but Liston is actually in Essex, not West Suffolk.

    Report this comment

    The original Victor Meldrew

    Friday, June 20, 2014

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

A community leader has made an impassioned plea for a precious area of countryside where 560 homes could be built to be saved from the developers’ bulldozers.

Daryl Goodrich to talk about his life in film making at University of Suffolk

Please get in touch and please come home is the message to missing RAF Honington serviceman Corrie McKeague from his uncle, a week after he was last seen.

From the minute The Dreamboys stepped on stage, I knew it was going to be a great show.

Health workers have been caught stealing controlled drugs from some of the region’s hospitals, it can be revealed.

Aspiring rock-gods and up-and-coming shredders have pitted their axe-wielding skills to the test in a competition to find Ipswich’s top air guitar hero.

Five men have been jailed for a total of 112 years for conspiring to murder a man in Bury St Edmunds who was left for dead after being shot with a sawn-off shotgun.

Now 10 games into the season and Ipswich Town sit 13th in the table. Is that going to be the club’s level for the rest of the season?

Police in Ipswich are cracking down on anti-social behaviour in Christchurch Park, after reports of drug users and heavy drinkers in the area.

The first layers of paint concealing one of Carl Giles’s most important pieces of artwork have been scraped away – but it is still too early to tell if it can be salvaged.

Most read

Most commented

HOT JOBS

Show Job Lists

Topic pages

Streetlife

Newsletter Sign Up

MyDate24 MyPhotos24