Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 2°C

min temp: 0°C

Search

‘Lost masterpiece’ by Dantan valued at £50,000 found in Woodbridge home to be auctioned in Colchester

PUBLISHED: 06:57 15 June 2017 | UPDATED: 06:57 15 June 2017

'Hercules at the feet of Omphale' by Edouard Dantan with original frame. Picture: REEMAN DANSIE

'Hercules at the feet of Omphale' by Edouard Dantan with original frame. Picture: REEMAN DANSIE

Archant

A “forgotten masterpiece” featuring Van Gogh’s mistress discovered in the stairwell of a Woodbridge home will go under the hammer in Colchester later this month valued at up to £50,000.

Hercules aux pied d’Omphale (Hercules at the feet of Omphale) was painted by Edouard Joseph Dantan and first exhibited in Paris in 1874.

Bought by the Royal Manchester Institute for 3,000 francs, it was later owned by the Sidebottom family and has remained in the industrialist family ever since – but had been almost forgotten about by the art world, remembered mostly by an engraving done in 1884 rather than by the original.

The 3.5 by 5ft canvas, with its original frame, was found again during a house clearance in Woodbridge and will be sold at Colchester’s Reeman Dansie auction house on June 21 with an estimate of £30-50,000.

Auctioneer Daniel Wright said: “It is extremely uncommon to rediscover such a significant work – the term ‘lost masterpiece’ is not an overstatement. It is probably an over-used term, but not in this case.

“This is a museum piece, and to uncover a painting of this calibre is very unusual.

“This must be considered one of the artist’s finest works. Although only 28 when this was painted, 3,000 francs represented Dantan’s largest payday for several years.”

The work is expected to gain significant international interest, and the record price for Dantan (1846-1897) is $215,000 in Christies, New York, in 1995.

As well as being a fine piece in its own right, the model for Omphale was Dantan’s then partner and mother to his first child Agostina Segatori.

A famous model who posed for many leading artists including Manet and Delcacroix, Segatori in later years ran Le Cafe Tambourin – a notorious haunt of Boehmian Paris frequented by Vincent Van Gogh. Van Gogh struck a deal with Agostina, who gave him food in exchange for paintings, and the artist held his first Paris exhibition in the cafe – and the two in time became lovers.

“All of those artists in that period would have been acquaintances,” added Mr Wright.

“Dantan ran in the same circles and was well-respected, though he is not perhaps the household name some of the others have become.

“This is one of his major works, and he kept very good accounts referencing this particular painting, which took six months to complete.”

A suspected illegal immigrant found under a school bus at a Suffolk primary school following a trip to France was a Sudanese minor, the Home Office has confirmed.

An appeal to build 300 homes off Bell Lane in Kesgrave could end up going to the High Court after Persimmon Homes has called for a judicial review of the Planning Inspectorate’s appeal findings.

Suffolk’s police and crime commissioner has pledged to ask the government to pay for the £1.5million search for missing RAF serviceman Corrie McKeague.

A dog owner has been fined after pleading guilty to being in charge of a ‘dangerously out of control dog’.

Demolition work on the silos at the former British Sugar plant at Sproughton outside Ipswich has started – and the four massive structures should be a thing of the past by the end of February.

A woman who claims she was raped more than a decade ago by a Felixstowe man reported the alleged attack to the police after she saw a newspaper article about him appearing in court for sex offences relating to two teenage girls, a court has heard.

In three decades of policing, Gareth Wilson has witnessed huge change perhaps never more so than in his last three years as Suffolk’s chief constable.

Proposals to close the junction between Rands Way and Nacton Road have been abandoned after the idea provoked a storm of objections in a public consultation exercise.

If you’ve ever been frustrated by struggling to see the directions on a dirty Suffolk road sign, don’t be too surprised – the county council spends just over £1 per sign per year on keeping them up to scratch!

A memorial stone in memory of all those locally who served in Korea from 1950-53 has been unveiled at the Millennium Cemetery in Ipswich.

Most read

Show Job Lists

Topic pages

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter
MyDate24 MyPhotos24