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Suffolk: Family’s dog warning

12:38 13 November 2012

The Doy family are delighted to have Sharnie the dog back home after she went missing.  Kirsty,Melissa and Kyra Doy with Sharnie.

The Doy family are delighted to have Sharnie the dog back home after she went missing. Kirsty,Melissa and Kyra Doy with Sharnie.

© Archant 2012

When Paul Casbolt and Shirley Doy realised their beloved pet husky was missing, they were fearful for her safety.


After a frantic search and phone calls, they were relieved to hear that four-year-old Sharnie had been found safe and well near Lowestoft town centre and had been taken to a Waveney District Council kennel.

But they were shocked to learn they faced a £175 bill – because she had no tag and was classed as a stray.

Although the couple managed to get the fee reduced to £25 because Sharnie had been microchipped days earlier, the council says the case once again highlights the need for all owners to ensure their dogs have proper ID tags.

The family’s problems began when Sharnie managed to slip out of their home in Beckham Road. As they began searching for her, they were unaware she had been found safe and well near Roman Hill Primary School and sent to a kennel as the council believed she had neither a microchip nor an ID tag, as legally required.

Mr Casbolt and his partner, who live with their four children and a grandchild, were told by the council they would have to pay £160 to reclaim Sharnie after just one day in the kennel.

But the size of fee – which would have increased daily – meant the couple, who are both unemployed, could not afford to bring her home.

Fortunately, Sharnie had been microchipped a week before she escaped, which meant she should not have been categorised as a stray, and the council was unaware of this as the paperwork had not been processed.

When the council realised, it reduced the fee to a £25 “statutory charge” instead.

Mr Casbolt, 38, said: “The council told us that if we paid the full fee we could have her back straight way but warned us the fee would go up to over £200 for the second day then continue to rise daily – until seven days, at which point she would be re-homed.

“We’d only had Sharnie microchipped recently and the paperwork had not been done.

“I’m very glad now that we’d got it done.”

Mr Casbolt and Ms Doy, who live with their children Kirsty, Melissa, Jacob and Callum and Kirsty’s daughter Kyra, have now bought a dog tag – and they are urging other owners to ensure they do the same.

A council spokesman said collecting stray dogs cost the authority more than £23,000 a year and, to help offset this, it had increased its fees for kennelling and collecting them.



  • If you are unemployed and cannot afford to pay for things that can happen unexpectedly with your pets, then you should rehome them with someone who can. As much as you might love them, should something happen and you aren't insured what would you do then? Vets bills can run into thousands of pounds!

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    Friday, November 16, 2012

  • Erm, pedigree dogs like Sharnie don't come cheap, so no good complaining you're on benefits and can't afford it. If you're on benefits you can't afford a £600 pedigree dog anyway - end of! PS, if you can afford paying that for a dog then benefits are way to high.

    Report this comment

    Suffolk Sue

    Tuesday, November 13, 2012

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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