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Trimley: Triple-glazing to be offered to cut A14 lorry traffic noise

17:15 24 January 2013

Suffolk Coastal MP Therese Coffey and Trimley parish and district councillor Graham Harding discuss the possible options for acoustic barriers alongside the A14.

Suffolk Coastal MP Therese Coffey and Trimley parish and district councillor Graham Harding discuss the possible options for acoustic barriers alongside the A14.


MOVES to build an acoustic barrier alongside the A14 to cut lorry noise which is making residents’ lives a misery today look set to fail.

Instead householders are set to be offered the opportunity of free triple-glazing to keep out the traffic din.

The latest moves follow months of investigations – including a full-scale sound survey to identify the worst affected areas of Trimley St Martin and Trimley St Mary – with £500,000 available for the project as part of the mitigation for the most recent port expansion.

Councillor Graham Harding, who on behalf of Trimley St Mary Parish Council has been putting pressure on Suffolk Coastal and the Port of Felixstowe to resolve the noise problems, said both the barrier and triple-glazing options were still on the table.

However, the barrier could only be put in place if all affected residents agreed, as any gap would mean it would not work – and there was already opposition on the Farmlands estate.

“The barrier would be three metres high and just six feet away from existing back garden fences,” said Mr Harding.

“There would be a significant visual impact close to the property although a huge benefit in reduction in the sound of traffic on the A14.”

There were concerns though not only about the sight of the barrier, but also that the six feet gap – needed for maintenance – would create a corridor that might be used for anti-social behaviour or as a dump for garden waste, attracting vermin.

Some residents canvassed in Fen Meadow and Thomas Avenue had been against the proposal.

This would leave the only option as triple-glazing but councillors said there would need to be a clear explanation from the port and district council as to why some properties qualified and others did not.

Letters would be sent soon to households.

“The parish council has tried to act as an honest broker in this matter to get some action – there is some urgency because if the work is not done soon the money will be lost,” said Mr Harding.

Parish council chairman Colin Jacobs said: “It is a shame we cannot stop the noise at the source – sound absorbent road surfacing would cure most of the problems.”


  • My house backs onto the A14 at the trimley end, and I would much prefer sound fences as I would like to use my garden in the summer. Without a sound barrier it would make my garden unusable. Also if the fence is painted sky blue it would camouflage it making the brain think its just sky though the tree’s.

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    Thursday, January 24, 2013

  • How long has that road been there , i worked on that road when it was build ,, must be in the 80 s .. These people knew when they bought their properties that the road was there , so why are they complaining about the noise,, if they want Triple glazing they should pay for it just like any other house owner do , not get it free off of the council-tax payer ,, and if your not prepared to pay ,,, on your bike

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    Thursday, January 24, 2013

  • I'm on the farmlands estate, the noise is worse than it was years ago due to the higher volume of traffic for one thing. And also just recently the changes at the dock spur roundabout have made matters worse, there used to be a rolling junction from the docks towards ipswich which allowed the lorries to keep going. Now the new traffic lights which are on a very short cycle, mean most lorries have to stop, then rev up to get going again causing extra noise and smoke pollution. Bring back the rolling junction.

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    Thursday, January 24, 2013

  • Triple glazing will not help with outdoor noise and it certainly won't stop the pollutants that building houses next to ever increasingly busy roads entails. Have never understood that, houses should be back off the roads to give a good quality of life and air.

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    C Smith

    Thursday, January 24, 2013

  • So who is representing who??

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    Monday, January 28, 2013

  • i bought my house in 2000 and the noise was not as bad as it is now there is a lot more trafic late at night and early morningsthese days luckily i only have it coming through the bedroom window.and find it most disturbing espiecialy on a still night so please dont be so ignorant miguel100. i suppose you live in a field away from any rds because you thought a head. do me a favour unless you deal with the noise keep your opinions to yourself .

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    Paul Mcglynn

    Thursday, January 24, 2013

  • How about this, zaax? Ask them to double glaze your garden !!

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    Sunday, January 27, 2013

  • A number of issues are not addressed by this article - What about low noise tarmac (tarmac mixed with old tyres, and very effective) combined with an earth dam covered with sound-absorbing vegetation; What about the police's controlling the suped-up cars and motorbikes that make far more noise than trucks; Double glazing is excellent in reducing the noise inside the house, but triple glazing has no incremental benefit in wood-framebrick-skin houses (as in Faulkeners Way area) because the noise will pass through the walls and not the windows; Restrict heavy traffic movements to early morning up to 10.00 a.m. and to evening 7.00 p.m. to 10.00 p.m.; Wear earplugs.

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    Sunday, January 27, 2013

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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