Overcast

Overcast

max temp: 23°C

min temp: 16°C

Search

The pigs have arrived. See the latest

Pigs Gone Wild

news here.

Video: Exciting finds at Rendlesham reveal everyday life in Suffolk’s ‘village of the kings’

18:00 12 March 2014

Metal detectorists Terry Marsh, Alan Smith, Roy Damant and Robert Atfield visited the new exhibition of the items found in Suffolk

Metal detectorists Terry Marsh, Alan Smith, Roy Damant and Robert Atfield visited the new exhibition of the items found in Suffolk's village of the kings that includes the items they found.

Finds made at Suffolk’s “village of the kings” have forced archaeologists to rethink their previous understanding of the way Anglo-Saxon society worked.

Suffolk County Council archaeology officer and co-director Judith Plouviez, co-director Professor Chris Scull and National Trust Archaeologist Martin Payne view the new exhibition of the items found in Suffolk's village of the kings is opening at the Sutton Hoo Visitor Centre.Suffolk County Council archaeology officer and co-director Judith Plouviez, co-director Professor Chris Scull and National Trust Archaeologist Martin Payne view the new exhibition of the items found in Suffolk's village of the kings is opening at the Sutton Hoo Visitor Centre.

They have described it as the “largest and materially richest” site of its kind in England.

Seventy small objects from some 3,500 unearthed at Rendlesham over the past six years were revealed yesterday at the launch of a new seven-month long exhibition at Sutton Hoo.

While the weapons, gold and ornaments of the ship burial – believed to be that of King Raedwald – at Sutton Hoo showed the wealth and power of royalty 1,400 years ago, the finds at Rendlesham illustrate the everyday life of Saxon people.

Items left in Raedwald’s chamber were put there deliberately – symbols of his power, connected to ritual and memory.

A new exhibition of the items found in Suffolk's village of the kings is opening at the Sutton Hoo Visitor Centre.A new exhibition of the items found in Suffolk's village of the kings is opening at the Sutton Hoo Visitor Centre.

In contrast, the coins, fragments of gold jewellery, pieces of metalwork, including cut gold sheet, from a smith’s workshop, weights and other items from the 120-acre site at Rendlesham were those which were dropped or discarded, or lost, or even part of rubbish later spread on the land to fertilise it, by people going about their daily business.

The archaeologists though are convinced the two sites are linked – and gold coins found at Rendlesham were compatible with those from Sutton Hoo.

Academic advisor Professor Christopher Scull, of Cardiff University and University College London, said the survey of the site had drawn together a partnership including the county archaeological service and authorised metal detector users, with funding from English Heritage, the county council and Sutton Hoo Society – in a project work up to £200,000.

The site – which is around 700 metres by 200m – had been surveyed using a variety of methods, including metal detecting, aerial photography, geophysics and chemical analysis.

Making a find was like winning the cup!

Four metal detector enthusiasts have told how each discovery of a special find was “like winning the FA Cup”.

Terry Marsh, Alan Smith, Roy Damant and Robert Atfield were called in by Suffolk County Council’s archaeological service and authorised to methodically comb the site at Rendlesham, working as a team to walk every inch of the fields with their equipment.

Project manager Jude Plouviez paid tribute to the quartet and said it was a very thorough and slow process and they had given 170 man days each year.

Mr Marsh said: “When you dig something up you don’t know what you have got in your hand. To find something really special like a gold coin is a real ‘yes!’ moment – quite magical, one of the real pleasures of metal detecting.”

Mr Atfield said: “Our work is non-destructive – we work in the plough soil, which has been churned up many times over the years.”

He said for every 50 or 60 ring pulls and other odd bits of metal, less than three recordable pieces of archaeology are found.

There had been some small excavation work at sites identified by the survey which confirmed buildings had existed on the land.

Prof Scull said buildings would have been scattered across the land – not like an urban town of today. The homes of the high-status would have been separate and there may have been a tented encampment for part of the year as people from a wide area arrived to trade or for fairs.

He said: “The survey has identified a site of national and indeed international importance for the understanding of the Anglo-Saxon elite and their European connections.

“The quality of some of the metalwork leaves no doubt that it was made for and used by the highest ranks of society. These exceptional discoveries are truly significant in throwing new light on early East Anglia and the origins of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.”

The continued occupation of Rendlesham over 300 years or more revealed a sophisticated system of economy and administration which would force a rethink on many aspects of Anglo-Saxon society, and a reappraisal of sites at home and abroad.

The National Trust exhibition of the Rendlesham finds opens on Saturday, March 15, and runs until October.

0 comments

Programme Name: Robot Wars - TX: n/a - Episode: n/a (No. n/a) - Picture Shows: The House Robots Dead Metal, Sir Killalot, Matilda, Shunt - (C) Mentorn Media Scotland - Photographer: Alan Peebles

“For too long, the schedules have cried out for a show in which dedicated amateurs, toiling day and night, handcraft sophisticated automatons built on the delicate interplay of hand-wired servo motors with custom-built circuit boards and fingertip motion control, just to see them get smashed to pieces by a dustbin carrying a massive hammer.

Flower left at Bramford Recreation Ground on Saturday to mark the third anniversary of toddler Ryan Ward's death.

Travellers have arrived at a playing field in Ipswich - almost three years to the day since a toddler was killed in a collision with a van at the same site.

Abellio Greater Anglia

A person has been pronounced dead after being struck by a train near Needham Market station.

A company in Gt. Blakenham has been making insoles for years but everything has suddenly taken off since Usain Bolt started using their products. Pictured is director Bente Smith-Rewse.

He is one of the most recognisable, decorated and influential sportsmen on the planet – but Usain Bolt is now endorsing a product made in the heart of Suffolk.

The snake captured by residents in St John's Road, Ipswich.

Brave neighbours came to the aid of a father and his three young daughters who were left stunned when they discovered an exotic-looking snake coiled in their back garden.

England's Harry Martin in 2014.

The greatest sporting spectacle on the planet is almost upon us once again.

Sandcastle building at Southwold

What are we doing today? The summer holidays are here and to help parents in Suffolk we are offering a guide to 12 days out on the Suffolk coast that won’t cost a penny.

Firefighters from Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service attended.

Firefighters helped free a baby locked in a car in Ipswich today.

Roadworks currently ongoing at Majors Corner, Ipswich.

Work to upgrade the gas mains in Ipswich’s Woodbridge Road East has been postponed until August 1 following a request from Suffolk County Council.

The A11 in Thetford.

A motorcyclist is believed to have come off his vehicle on the A11 as a result of spilt treacle on the road.

Most read

Most commented

HOT JOBS

Show Job Lists

Topic pages

Streetlife

Newsletter Sign Up

Great British Life

Great British Life
MyDate24 MyPhotos24