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Sunday, October 15, 2017

In 1849 the Freehold Land Society purchased a large tract of farmland east of Ipswich and set about dividing it into individual plots.

We all know that the “High Street” is suffering, losing trade to the Internet to the out-of-town shopping centres and simply because our buying habits are changing, writes John Norman.

You might remember from a recent article that the whole of Portman’s Marshes came into the possession of the Corporation of Ipswich following the Municipal Corporations Act of 1835, writes John Norman.

I spent my formative years in Burton on Trent, the brewing capital of the United Kingdom, writes John Norman

How the mansion got a new role, by Bob Markham, formerly the Keeper of Geology at Ipswich Museum.

Marcus Evans is just a tenant? Who knew? John Norman explains the story behind Portman’s Marshes.

To include this article under the banner Ipswich Icons is a misnomer. We usually feature buildings and other characteristics of the built environment that stand proud and prominent in the town, writes John Norman.

If you enter Christchurch Park through the Soane Street gates and walk up towards the mansion you are also approaching the site of the St Augustinian Priory founded during the reign of Henry II in 1160, writes John Norman.

John Norman investigates ‘Roman roads’ around Ipswich and looks for evidence of their existence

This is the story of the Neptune Inn in Fore Street, but before we learn of its history there are two diversionary tales, writes John Norman.

If you went to Northgate in the pre-1977 halcyon days, when it still was a grammar school, you won’t need me to tell you what a good school it was. It still is! Writes John Norman.

The main road into Ipswich from the south was, historically, across Bourne Bridge, along Wherstead Road, through the parish of Stoke and then crossing the Orwell by way of a ford between Great Whip Street and Foundry Road, writes John Norman of the Ipswich Society.

Whilst reading this article you won’t be surprised to learn that it was written using a word processing package on a desktop computer, and this digital information was sent to the East Anglian Daily Times for conversion into print using editing software, writes John Norman of the Ipswich Society.

Land outside Ipswich, which was one pasture and fields, is now home to thousands of people, writes John Norman of the Ipswich Society.

There was great excitement in the borough council when the Ipswich Building Society announced it was moving into the former Chelsea Building Society offices in Princes Street, writes John Norman of The Ipswich Society.

The two great hotels in Ipswich during the first 75 years of the 20th Century were the Great White Horse and the Crown and Anchor, both Trust House Forte hotels, writes John Norman, of The Ipswich Society.

Ships have been built on the banks of the Orwell since time immemorial, writes John Norman of The Ipswich Society.

John Norman reminds us how much of a privilege it once was to have a decent education – and not so very long ago, either.

In his second article on the Corn Exchange, The Ipswich Society’s John Norman, takes a look at a series of new dawns, and sunsets, for the town and its traders.

Corn and complaints. John Norman, from the Ipswich Society, looks at the less than ideal conditions in which the market-makers worked to strike a deal in Ipswich.

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