max temp: -2°C

min temp: -2°C


Eddi Reader looks to create a special bond with Apex audiences

PUBLISHED: 18:30 10 November 2017 | UPDATED: 18:30 10 November 2017

Scottish singer-songwriter Eddi Reader who is performing at The Apex. Photo: Eddi Reader

Scottish singer-songwriter Eddi Reader who is performing at The Apex. Photo: Eddi Reader


Scottish singer Eddi Reader loves performing live but she’s not keen on listening to herself. Arts editor Andrew Clarke spoke to her on the eve of her Apex concert and discovers that a new ‘Best Of’ album has persuaded her to revisit her past

Eddi Reader, who is performing atThe Apex, Bury St Edmunds Eddi Reader, who is performing atThe Apex, Bury St Edmunds

Like most creative artists, singer-songwriter Eddi Reader is more interested in looking ahead than revisiting the past. Although she performs songs from her long and varied career on stage every night, each time she performs them they appear fresh both for her and the audience.

She thinks of them as living, breathing entities which evolve and change over time, shaped by the audience, her mood and the interaction with the band. “A live performance is a wonderful shifting thing. No two nights are ever the same,” she says.

This love of performance and this spontaneous desire for continual reinvention means that Eddi has not used a set list in years and having a stable band means that they can summon up virtually any number from her extensive songbook seemingly on a whim.

“Sometimes if we haven’t played something for a while, parts can seem rather raw, but that’s part of the charm of a live performance.”

Scottish singer-songwriter Eddi Reader who is performing at The Apex. Photo Genevieve Stevenson Scottish singer-songwriter Eddi Reader who is performing at The Apex. Photo Genevieve Stevenson

But, in recent months Eddi has had a chance to reacquaint herself with some of her most enduring recordings – both from her Fairground Attraction days and her subsequent solo career – and it’s not something she imagined she’d be doing.

“I don’t like listening to myself. It’s not something I spend any time doing. Once something is recorded and it’s been done to my satisfaction I like to move on. Once the album is out I don’t go back to it. The songs live on in a live setting but I don’t listen to the recording again.”

But, all this changed when her manager suggested that the time was ripe for a best of collection which would bring together Eddi’s best-loved songs from all phases of her career. “I think everyone was getting tired of waiting for the new album. It’s coming along, I’ve got plenty of new songs, but I’ve got to get back into the studio to finish off the album but things keep getting in the way.

“So, it was suggested that we pull together a best of which brings together material from 30 years of recording. I have to confess when it was first suggested I was not keen but they made a track selection, two albums worth of material, sent it to me, and I was pleasantly surprised. I hadn’t listened to some of these songs since I put them down and it was like coming to them afresh.

“Sometimes it takes an outside ear to help you reconnect with your past. They did a very good job in bringing all my different musical interests together in one package.”

This eclectic collection will undoubtedly have an impact on Eddi’s upcoming tour and will ensure that the song choices are even more surprising than normal.

“I love performing. For me that’s where the songs come alive. I love making that connection with the audience and working with the band. We know each other so well after 20-odd years playing together that we can push and respond to each other and shape the music in lots of interesting ways.

“And, the audiences play a huge part – the way they react and respond means that every night is unique. Even if we play the same song on consecutive nights, it will be different every time.”

One of the aspects of Eddi’s live show is her ability to turn even the largest venues into an intimate space – something akin to The Snug in a village pub. Her stories and at times humorously revealing introductions to songs allow her to make a connection to everyone in the room, no matter where they are sitting.

“I find that over the years, with the more gigs I do, I find myself relying more and more on my own instincts. They have served me well. I think that most of us have a need to feel connected and when I play before a group of people, and it doesn’t matter how many, you have an opportunity to connect, to make contact. It’s all about communication.

“I have an affinity with singing. It’s something I was born with. It’s outside my control. But, I developed a love of singing very early on and there are many unknown factors which shape the life of child but it seems I was destined to be a singer and it’s something I love. I love getting up before people and singing. It’s a great way to earn a living, bringing joy to countless people over many, many years. What an honour. What a way to spend your days. How fantastic is that?

“And not only to sing my songs but to have a chance to share the stage with other great singers and musicians, other great songwriters and to shine a light on my heroes, to bring the work of Robbie Burns to a whole new audience. It’s magical.”

Eddi Reader will be appearing at The Apex, Bury St Edmunds, on Saturday November 11.

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Shakespeare’s Macbeth has been transformed into an atmospheric piece of dance theatre. Arts editor Andrew Clarke spoke to choreographer Mark Bruce about his love of classic theatre and how dance can re-imagine how see familiar stories

Movies that tell a good story and have engaging characters provide that all-important re-watch value necessary for a great film. Arts editor Andrew Clarke presents a series of idiosyncratic suggestions for movies which may entertain if you are in the mood for something different

Wolf Hall, the story of Thomas Cromwell and Henry VIII, is one of great historical dramas of recent years. Arts Editor Andrew Clarke talks to director James Hayward about the Gallery Players regional premiere and how they have brought Wolsey back home

East Anglian actor Milo Parker has made a big impression in a few short years. Arts editor Andrew Clarke spoke to him as he returns to our TV screens in The Durrells

Whitney Houston. What a voice. But can Queen of the Night tribute Shanice Smith live up to the legend?

The team beind Pop Up Pictures is giving you the chance to pick which Thursday night family favourite is shown in Ipswich as part of this year’s Great Outdoor Cinema Club.

Mark Thomas uses his own demise to explore the state of the National Health Service in latest show Check Up - Our NHS at 70.

Save Me is a clever layer cake of a drama which boasts outstanding performances from Lennie James and Suranne Jones and is a breath of fresh air in comparison to other tired police procedurals.

Festival of Wheels rolls into Trinity Park this summer, with plenty to get your motor running.

Efforts to portay the enigmatic and misunderstood Mary Magdalene on the big screen have often proved controversial. Now a new take on the life of the apostle aims to turn sparse factual history into a story of faith and heroism.

Most read

Show Job Lists

Topic pages

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter
MyDate24 MyPhotos24