The 30 Suffolk beauty spots everyone should see before they die

i took these pictures of a stormy day over the easter bank holiday

St Andrews Church in Covehithe - Credit: David Andrews

Everyone in Suffolk knows we have plenty of beautiful spots across the county.

But research by Vision Express naming the 30 UK best beauty spots in the UK failed to produce any in the county.  

We've put together a list of 30, just to prove them wrong:

1. The Kersey Splash

EADT LaurenceGv of Kersey splashA family of ducks have appeared after three years of

The Kersey Splash - Credit: Wendy Turner

A dip in the road with water in it shouldn't be that impressive but combine the reflective surface with the beautiful village of Kersey and you get one of the most beautiful parts of Babergh. 

2. Pin Mill

The sun sets on the water at Pin Mill.

The sun setting on the water over Pin Mill - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Located on the River Orwell, just a few miles east of Ipswich, Pin Mill offers beautiful views over the river to Nacton Shores.

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In addition to the river views themselves, the port is home to multiple impressive Thames and Dutch barges. 

3. Ufford Hole

 Ufford Hole

Ufford Hole is at the tips of the river Deben - Credit: Dominic Allen

At the tips of river Deben, up past the Wilford Bridge sits Ufford Hole.

A popular spot where local children swim and camp, in summer it is surrounded by beautiful green foliage, and you can hear the babbling of water flowing past. 

4. Ramsholt Dock

Situated on the northern shore of the River Deben is Ramsholt, a quiet village that will give you am

Situated on the northern shore of the River Deben is Ramsholt Dock, offering fantastic views over the reedbeds and mud flats - Credit: Kim Dewing

Next to the Ramsholt Arms pub, Ramsholt Dock is a great starting point for walking along the river Deben. It offers easy access to the marshes, slightly further up the river where you can see a wide variety of wading birds and other waterfowl. 

5. Ickworth House

Beginning of autumn at Ickworth House. Picture: GREGG BROWN

Beginning of autumn at Ickworth House. Picture: GREGG BROWN - Credit: Gregg Brown

An enormous neoclassical mansion, Ickworth house is one of the most impressive stately homes in the UK. Based around a gigantic rotunda, the house was built in the early 19th century and is surrounded by elegantly manicured gardens. 

6. Flatford Mill

Willy Lott's house at Flatford Mill next to the Mill Pond - the scene of Constable's Hay Wain painti

Willy Lott's house at Flatford Mill next to the Mill Pond - the scene of Constable's Hay Wain painting and virtually unchanged since 1821. - Credit: Sarah Lucy brown

Painted by famous artist John Constable 200 years ago, Fllatford Mill remains a rural idyll and is home to one of the UK's best walks. 

7. Orford Ness

EADT news Lab 4 one of the 'pagoda buildings' on Orford Island.Picture Owen Hines 13.8.08

Lab 4, one of the 'pagoda buildings' on Orford Ness. - Credit: Owen Hines

Mysterious, isolated and somewhat bleak, the home of Britain's top-secret nuclear programme is unlike almost anywhere else in the country. One can watch sheep graze and rare birds nest while exposed to the might of the north sea. 

8. Thorpeness

The House in the Clouds is an iconic Thorpeness bulding

The House in the Clouds is an iconic Thorpeness bulding - Credit: CHARLOTTE BOND

A holiday village built by a wealthy eccentric Scottish railway baron, Thorpeness is a village by the sea home to interesting architecture built in the Jacobean and Tudor revival style.

The Meare, set behind the village is a fantastic place to explore in a small boat, which is available for hire at Thorpeness.

9. Dunwich Beach

Dunwich beach is one of the county's most haunted locations

Dunwich beach is one of the county's most haunted locations - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Long, exposed and windswept, Dunwich Beach has a haunting feel that makes sense when you realise that just a few hundred meters out to sea is Suffolk's former capital.

Local legends say that on windy days, you can still hear the sound of the town's 12 church bells ring. 

10. Minsmere

Red Deer at Minsmere RSPB reserve in Suffolk PICTURE: CHARLOTTE BOND

Red Deer at Minsmere RSPB reserve in Suffolk - Credit: CHARLOTTE BOND

Home of the elusive Bitten, Minsmere is an expansive nature reserve of 2,500 acres covering multiple habitats including heath, grassland, woodland and wetland. 

While the site was drained for farmland in the 19th century, during World War Two the land was flooded again to prevent a possible German invasion.

11. Covehithe

i took these pictures of a stormy day over the easter bank holiday

St Andrews Church in Covehithe - Credit: David Andrews

Famed for being the village falling into the sea, Covehithe has more to offer than a sense of the temporariness of all things.

Much of what was once a town has since been washed under the sea, but the remains of St Andrews Church are still impressive. 

12. Pakefield Beach

 Last ones from a lovely afternoon

Pakefield beach is one of the best places for fossil hunting in the UK - Credit: Caroline Woodgate

Pakefield offers expansive beaches with sand fit for building a fortress or at least replicating the clifftop village's diminutive lighthouse. 

The cliffs are also perfect for fossil hunters, with some of the earliest evidence of human habitation in the UK having been found there. 

13. Rendlesham Forest

 Winter walk in Rendlesham Forest.

Sunlight streaming into Rendlesham Forest - Credit: Tim Denny

Once home to the Wulfinghast Kings of East Anglia's royal palace, Rendlesham Forest is a tangle of managed woodland and heathland stretching across the Wilford Penisula. 

With the light streaming through the trees and mist in the air, a walk through these woods can be one of the most invigorating experiences available in the county. 

14. Melton Riverside

Melton boat yard photo essay Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

Melton docks are occupied by a wide variety of vessels - Credit: CHARLOTTE BOND

A collection of ramshackle vessels line the side of the river Deben at Melton, with everything ranging from warships to floating cabins accounted for. 

One can get something to eat and drink on the HMS Vale, and enjoy the view over the river and mudflats to Sutton Hoo. 

15. Sutton Hoo

Sutton Hoo visitor numbers rose in 2021.

The mounds in front of Tranmer house - Credit: Paul Geater

Made famous by the discovery of King Raedwalds ship, and the Netflix film detailing that excavation, Sutton Hoo itself is an incredible landscape of meadows and woodlands running down to the river. 

The beauty the area generates really gives you a sense of why ancient royalty wanted it as their resting place. 

16. Framlingham Castle

Framlingham Castle was built in the 12th century 

Framlingham Castle was built in the 12th century - Credit: Timothy Bradford

Made world-famous by Suffolk troubadour extraordinaire Ed Sheeran, Framlingham Castle is set on a hill overlooking the small market town.

17. The Blyth Estuary

The Blyth estuary meets the sea at Southwold Harbour

The Blyth estuary meets the sea at Southwold Harbour - Credit: iwitness

Located up the river from the seaside town of Southwold, the quiet reedbeds and mud banks are home to a huge variety of wildlife including marsh harriers, herons, and the rivers resident seal Dorothy. 

18. Kessingland Beach

Kessingland Beach. PHOTO:

Kessingland Beach stretches for more than 200m out to sea - Credit: Reece Hanson

Stretching more than 200 metres from the cliff, these shingle-strewn dunes are covered with tufts of coarse grass and give the feeling of being in a tiny desert.

With views of the clifftop village and out to sea, the beach gives you a sense of being in between two worlds. 

19. Shingle Street

People out for a seaside stroll at Shingle Street beach Picture: CHARLOTTE BOND

Shingle Street near Hollesley is a great place for kite surfing, or a long walk - Credit: Charlotte Bond

An isolated hamlet on the beach, alongside the mouth of the River Alde, Shingle Street lives up to its name, being a single street next to a whole lot of shingle. It is absolutely beautiful, in a bleak way, and a choice spot for kite surfing.

20. Abbey Gardens 

The Abbey Gardens ruins in Bury St Edmunds. Picture: MARK LANGFORD

The Abbey Gardens ruins in Bury St Edmunds. - Credit: MARK LANGFORD

Based around the ruins of what was once one of the most powerful monasteries in England, Bury St Edmund's Abbey Gardens displays more than 20,000 plants in 64 island beds. 

Visitors have referred to the gardens as a "jewel in the crown of the town" and "a tribute to all who work in them". 

21. East Lane

Mark's findings will help us not only understand Suffolk's past but also its future

The Martello towers, standing proud behind the sea wall at East \lane - Credit: Charlotte Bond

A strip of heavily fortified coastline running from the Deben to Shingle Street, East Lane in Bawdsey offers a glance back into the early 1940s or 1800s, with the bunkers and Martello towers dotting the coast reminding you of days when Britain faced invasion. 

22. Thetford Forest

Thetford Forest

Thetford Forest - Credit: Archant

Located on the Suffolk Norfolk border, Thetford Forest is the largest lowland pine forest in Britain, covering over 47,000 acres. 

Well known for rare birds including Woodlarks and Nightjars, the forest provides a haven for wildlife and plants. 

23. Lackford Lakes

Grey heron at Lackford Lakes. Picture: APRIL URQUHART

Grey heron at Lackford Lakes. Picture: - Credit: APRIL URQUHART

North of Bury St Edmunds you can find the Suffolk Wildlife Trust's reserve at Lackford Lakes.

The 261-acre site, which was made from disused sand and gravel pits in the Lack River valley, is home to diverse dragonfly species, and many breeding and overwintering birds.

24. West Stow

The Anglo Saxon village at West Stow Country Park. Picture: Danielle Booden

The Anglo Saxon village at West Stow Country Park.

Close to Lackfield Lakes is the leafy village of West Stow. The village, which dates back to the 5th century features a replica of the original Anglo Saxon settlement. 

25. Bradfield Woods

 Bradfield Woods National Nature Reserve Blue Trail walk

Bluebells in Bradfield woods - Credit: Andrew Mutimer

One of Britain's finest ancient woodlands, Bradfield Woods has been a working wood under continuous coppice management since 1252 providing timber and firewood and timber to local people. 

The coppiced trees provide excellent cover for migrant songbirds including the garden warbler, blackcap and willow warbler, as well as butterflies and mammals. 

26. Knettishall Heath

17 Exmoor Ponies grazing at Knettishall Heath Country Park.

17 Exmoor Ponies grazing at Knettishall Heath Country Park. - Credit: Andrew Mutimer

Despite its name, Knettishall Heath is in fact a diverse mosaic of habitats with woodland and riverside meadows as well as large areas of heathland. 

The open landscape was created by Bronze Age humans 4,000 years ago, and the heath still retains a sense of what it could be. 

More than 30% of the species found here are nationally rare, with some such as the carpet moth only being found here, while with others like Flixweed it is a national stronghold. 

27. Bungay Castle

Pic for Eastern Daily Press Norfolk Magazine; Pic for Bryan McNerney feature - The town of Bungay -

Pic for Eastern Daily Press Norfolk Magazine; Pic for Bryan McNerney feature - The town of Bungay - Bungay Castle.; Pic by Keiron Tovell; EDP Pics © 2004 Tel. (01603) 772434; Pic for EDP Norfolk Magazine; EADT 4.7.09 - Credit: Keiron Tovell

Built by the Baron Roger Bigod of Norfolk, Bungay castle was taken over by King Henry II following the Anarchy and used as a royal stronghold in the region.

The ruins of the castle are hidden away behind woodland and the more modern town, offering an oasis of calm in the middle of this north Suffolk settlement.

28. Fullers Mill Garden

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The gardens at Fullers Mill - Credit: Marcus Harpur

A tranquil seven-acre site on the banks of the river larch, Fullers Mill combines light dappled woodland with a plantsman's collection of unusual shrubs, perennials, lilies, and marginal plants.

The garden was created by the late Bernard Tickner MBE who moved there in 1958 and spent more than half a century working on it. 

29. Nowton Park

Nowton park in Bury St Edmunds saw a flurry of people through the weekend as the daffodils start to

Dafodils in Nowton park in Bury St Edmunds - Credit: CHARLOTTE BOND

Covering more than 200 acres of landscape Suffolk countryside, Nowton Park offers something for everyone. 

Nature lovers can visit the unique east and west arboretums which are home to trees from around the world, including eucalyptus from Australia, paperbark maple from China and Kentucky coffee trees from North America.

30. Lavenham

Lavenham was once the 14th richest town in England

Lavenham was once the 14th richest town in England - Credit: CHARLOTTE BOND

The village of Lavenham is the picture-perfect version of the English village, noted for its half-timbered late medieval cottages and guildhall. 

In the medieval period, it was one of the richest towns in the UK, which can still be seen in its architectural heritage.