10 of the most sorely missed Ipswich pubs as chosen by our readers

Were you a regular up the Blooming Fuchsia?

Were you a regular at the Blooming Fuchsia before it closed? - Credit: Archant

Local pubs have always been a cornerstone of Ipswich life, but they have come under threat in recent years with many popular drinking spots closing their doors.

To take a trip down memory lane, we asked our readers which Ipswich pubs they missed most.

Here are ten of the most popular answers:

The Golden Lion

Caught Out at Golden Lion I-SPY I SPY

Drinkers enjoy a gathering at The Golden Lion in Ipswich - Credit: Archant

The closure of The Golden Lion was announced in 2016 after a 500-year history, with the building estimated to have been constructed in the 1700s. 

The site had been owned and operated by JD Wetherspoon since 1998.

Blooming Fuchsia

The outside of the Blooming Fuchsia pub

The outside of the Blooming Fuchsia pub - Credit: Archant

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The Blooming Fuchsia stood in Foxhall Road before being permanently closed in 2009 and demolished in 2010.

The history of the pub dates back to some time in the late 1880s and was a popular choice for this list.

Duke of Gloucester

Behind the bar at The Duke of Gloucester pub in 1974

Behind the bar at The Duke of Gloucester pub in 1974 - Credit: Archant

Built by Cobbolds in the 1930s as the Gainsborough estate expanded, the pub in Clapgate Lane was a very popular venue for many years.

In the 1970s, one of our photographers went to meet some of the regulars.

Safe Harbour

The Safe Harbour, Meredith Road, closed in 1995 and was demolished in 1997. It replaced a public hou

The Safe Harbour, Meredith Road, closed in 1995 and was demolished in 1997. It replaced a public house of the same name in Dorkin Street, close to where the Suffolk New College is today. That area “The Potteries” was demolished in the 1930s and residents moved to new council housings on the edge of town including Whitton. The new Safe Harbour no doubt made people feel ‘at home’. This huge public house was built by the Tollemache Brewery. It was one of several built in Ipswich and they became known at “Tolly Follies”. An Aldi supermarket is now on this site. (Photo by Albert Gonzales). What memories do you have of the Whitton public houses. Write to Kindred Spirits, Ipswich Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich IP4 1AN or e-mail info@kindred-spirit.co.uk - Credit: David Kindred

The Safe Harbour, in Meredith Road, closed in 1995 and was demolished in 1997.

This huge public house was built by the Tollemache Brewery and it was one of several built in Ipswich that became known as “Tolly Follies”.

Royal William

Were you a regular punter in the 1970s? Picture: PAUL NIXON

Were you a regular punter in the 1970s? Picture: PAUL NIXON - Credit: Archant

Opened in the late 20th century, the Royal William was situated in London Road, and stood proudly in the community for decades.

It once had a large ornate garden that sat between the pub and the river.

Crown and Anchor

Westgate Street, Ipswich, with The Crown and Anchor, and its then new ornate gothic front, in the la

Westgate Street, Ipswich, with The Crown and Anchor, and its then new ornate gothic front, in the late 1890s. Inns have stood on the Crown and Anchor site since the sixteenth century. It was a coaching inn with daily services to Norwich and London. When it closed in 1986 it had fifty five bedrooms and closure meant forty five people lost their jobs. Footman’s store is on the right, now the site of Debenhams. W. H. Smiths now occupy most of the Crown and Anchor site. - Credit: David Kindred

Set in Westgate Street in Ipswich, The Crown and Anchor had been operating since at least the 1890s with an ornate gothic front.

When it closed in 1986 it had 55 bedrooms and closure meant 45 people lost their jobs.

The Brewery Tap

The deserted brewery at Cliff Quay, Ipswich. It was completed by Cobbolds in 1896 and extended in 19

The deserted brewery at Cliff Quay, Ipswich. It was completed by Cobbolds in 1896 and extended in 1904. The building in the foreground was Cliff House, once home to the head brewer, but used in recent years as the Brewery Tap public house, which closed in March 2017. Picture: DAVID KINDRED - Credit: DAVID KINDRED

The Brewery Tap public house closed in March 2017 and was located within Cliff House at Cliff Quay.

The brewery building was originally finished by Cobbolds in 1896 and extended in 1904.

The Garland

The Garland Pub in 1974 Picture: DAVID KINDRED

The Garland Pub in 1974 Picture: DAVID KINDRED - Credit: Archant

The Garland pub in Humber Doucy Lane closed in February 2015 and the 19th century building was later demolished in 2016.

It was popular in the 1960s, 70s and even in to the 80s because of its isolation.

Eastern Union Railway

EUR in Croft Street in 1975

EUR in Croft Street in 1975 - Credit: Archant

Ipswich’s first rail line was the Eastern Union Railway and it was an extension of the Eastern Counties Railway from London to Colchester.

The town's first ever railway station was located in Croft Street — and it was here that a pub bearing the name of the railway line opened its doors in the 1850s.

The EUR closed in 1993 but reopened briefly a year later.

Thomas Eldred

Thomas Eldred pub, in Cedarcroft Road Ipswich, July 1974

Thomas Eldred pub, in Cedarcroft Road Ipswich, July 1974 - Credit: ARCHANT

The Thomas Eldred pub in Cedarcroft Road, Ipswich, opened in 1953 when the neighbouring estate was built. According to CAMRA, it was a lively, estate-based sports bar.

It was named after an Ipswich merchant and mariner who sailed with Thomas Cavendish on the second English circumnavigation of the globe in the ship Desire between 1586-88.

In 2012, the pub was demolished to make space for six homes after it was deemed to no longer be viable as a business.