Action group shows its hand

LANDOWNER Trinity College is today facing a well-organised army of protesters determined to save their village from being swamped with homes.Action group STAG (Save Trimley Against Growth) last night enlisted its officers and foot soldiers in the battle to stop up to 3,000 homes being built, transforming the twin villages into an urban sprawl.

LANDOWNER Trinity College is today facing a well-organised army of protesters determined to save their village from being swamped with homes.

Action group STAG (Save Trimley Against Growth) last night enlisted its officers and foot soldiers in the battle to stop up to 3,000 homes being built, transforming the twin villages into an urban sprawl.

The group, which is completely non-political, has only one objective – to prove that development is not needed in Trimley St Mary and Trimley St Martin.

STAG spokeswoman Maddy Russell said until last night's public meeting at the Welcome Hall the group comprised just a few concerned residents and no committee or leaders had been appointed.


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The meeting was called to gather support and help, create teams to look at different aspects of the proposed development, and elect the group's leaders.

"We aim to show that there is no need for Trinity College's vision for the future of Trimley and that the need they claim is manufactured need," she said.

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"I live in Trimley because I like it, it's quiet, there are rural views, and little urbanisation – it's a nice place to live.

"That's the reason most people live here. We don't need to see it change and what we need to prove is that it doesn't need to – prove there is no need for this development."

There were lots of people with skills and motivation who could help, and the aim was with a team effort to prepare a professional presentation to give to Suffolk Coastal, MPs and the government against the proposals.

Based on current government-suggested housing densities, Trinity's proposal to use all the fields and open space between the A14 and Felixstowe-Ipswich railway line for greens and village centres, industrial area and homes, would see the village grow by 124 per cent with a population of 9,753.

It was possible that the plans could be in place within two years and STAG had only a year to prepare its submission for a public inquiry.

To spread the enormous workload, teams would be set up to look at different themes – including the plan's impact on community and leisure services, fire, police, ambulance, transport and traffic, education, healthcare and employment.

Other teams would deal with planning, liaise with the government and local councils, assess the effect on pollution, wildlife and conservation, land issues, and investigate other Trinity College projects.

Trinity College has submitted its proposals to Suffolk Coastal and its representatives Bidwells have held their first meeting with planning officers.

Bidwells have said that they want to hear all views on the proposals and say the ideas are not detailed at this stage and not set in stone.

n What do you think? Write to Your Letters, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail EveningStarLetters@eveningstar.co.uk

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