Air bosses promise more information

AIR chiefs who are looking afresh at proposals to change jet routes over Suffolk today promised to publish further reports as their work progresses.

AIR chiefs who are looking afresh at proposals to change jet routes over Suffolk today promised to publish further reports as their work progresses.

Amid continuing concern over the consultation process, bosses at air management company NATS said they would keep the public updated - but would not be responding to further questions at this stage.

NATS has pledged to review its proposals to change airspace after receiving thousands of protests from worried residents.

The changes - due to come into effect next year - would redraw the aircraft route map and create two new holds for Stansted arrivals.


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Other communities would see themselves under flightpaths for the first time while some will see less planes - at least until Stansted and Heathrow expand.

The Evening Star is campaigning for a fairer attitude to the handling of the constantly increasing number of passenger planes in Suffolk's skies - calling for numbers to be cut and for communities under flightpaths to have the noise burden shared by “spreading the load” and moving routes.

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A spokesman for NATS said initial work following the closure of the consultation had sought to identify the key issues and concerns people had raised.

He said: “NATS will be undertaking further analysis and design work on various elements of the initial proposal as a result of issues raised.

“In view of this, it should be noted that the initial feedback report is neither exhaustive nor definitive and the consideration of and response to the consultation feedback is an ongoing exercise.

“NATS will publish appropriate updates to this initial report when analysis is complete.”

NATS has said it will look again at the proposals for the two Stansted holds, but officers are adamant it is not feasible to move the holds over the sea as this would create enormous problems, lead to more miles for jets to fly, increase emissions, and be impossible to operate.

The company received 578 responses from MPs, councils, environmental groups and other bodies.

A further 14,647 responses were received from members of the public across southern and eastern England - 86 per cent against the proposals.

Main concerns were noise in rural areas compared to noise in towns and about spreading noise fairly across the population.

Are too many planes flying over Suffolk? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail EveningStarLetters@eveningstar.co.uk

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