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We’ve had Brexit but what exactly is Brexiquette?

PUBLISHED: 01:00 29 January 2019 | UPDATED: 16:24 29 January 2019

Brexit protestors' placards lay on the ground near Parliament in London, in January. Picture: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire

Brexit protestors' placards lay on the ground near Parliament in London, in January. Picture: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire

Archant

As an etiquette expert comes up with guidelines for MPs to get through Brexit...with good manners!

Would it hurt MPs to be polite to one another, irrespective of Brexit views? Picture: PA Wire.Would it hurt MPs to be polite to one another, irrespective of Brexit views? Picture: PA Wire.

After the Queen’s plea for people to respect one another’s views when she spoke at the Sandringham Women’s Institute last week, an etiquette expert has come up with some guidelines that might help.

Her Majesty, who was believed to be making reference to the turmoil of Brexit, asked for a “coming together to seek out the common ground”.

As the country endures another week with little but Britain’s manner of leaving the European Union on the agenda, the question remains, can MPs take note and put aside their differences? That, I should add, is a rhetorical question.

With this in mind, Royal commentator William Hanson has created ‘Brexiquette’, a list of how politicians could redeem their decorum in the House of Commons and make for a better Brexit - including showing more kindness, respect and cooperation for fellow members.

Always-polite Leave supporter Jacob Rees-Mogg with North West Norfolk MP Henry Bellingham. Picture: STUART ANDERSONAlways-polite Leave supporter Jacob Rees-Mogg with North West Norfolk MP Henry Bellingham. Picture: STUART ANDERSON

Personally, I would not advise holding your breath.

Hanson, says: “Etiquette may be a word that many associate with old, dusty grand houses and stiff upper lips, but it actually has more to do with good old fashioned manners, respect and a healthy lifestyle.”

Here is the list (my comments in brackets):

Observing Brexiquette may help fractured relationships, according to one expert. Picture: Getty Images/iStockphotoObserving Brexiquette may help fractured relationships, according to one expert. Picture: Getty Images/iStockphoto

What goes around comes around

Good manners are all about looking after others - they are self-less not selfish. Invest in some quality time sitting down, conversing with your fellow colleagues to see if you can help them with any of their own problems and come up with a sensible solution. A problem shared, is a problem halved, remember. They’ll pay back the kindness and generosity in spirit when the time comes maybe at the next vote!

Smile more and say hello

The Story of Brexit. Brexit and words derived from Brexit are impossible to avoid. Picture:  Archant LibraryThe Story of Brexit. Brexit and words derived from Brexit are impossible to avoid. Picture: Archant Library

Spread the positivity by changing how you acknowledge strangers. No need to say hello to everyone you pass, but give a polite smile (not a smile through gritted teeth, please) to most and say good morning or good afternoon to at least four people a day.

Tut less

There are a lot of pantomime noises that come from Parliament, but tutting is the worst. Curb the semi-silent, passive aggressive rebuke it will only get the oppositions’ backs up.

Be thankful

Nothing is nicer for someone than receiving a handwritten thank you letter or card in the post. A text or email that you may have written after you’ve left the green benches is not the same thing. Write short missives to those who gave you support. (if anyone)

Connect with a colleague

When at work, try to make friends with a colleague you don’t know overly well. Find out more about what makes then tick and what irks them. You may find you have more in common with them than you think.

Meet up for breakfast

Arrange to see people for breakfasts out and about. They get you up and out the door, ready to tackle the day sooner.

Limit the alcohol

Save yourself a sore head by cutting back (or even cutting out) alcohol.

It’s a nice thought, Mr Hanson but the exercise (Brexicise?) of British politics has rarely been a courteous affair and I fear MPs will not consider this an ideal time for rapprochement.

How many other variations on the word Brexit have we been subjected to?

1. Brexiteer: A pseudo-swashbucking term for a supporter of leaving the EU... like musketeer except hopefully without swords, horses and muskets.

2. Brexicon: Devised by The Independent - a cross between Brexit and lexicon, it is a dictionary of Brexit-related jargon.

3. Brexotic: A tendency to tilt at European windmills.

4. Brexistential crisis: A feeling of confusion and panic that has spread through at least 48% of the population. (Spectator)

5. Brexist: Discrimination or prejudice based on one’s view of Brexit (Urban dictionary).

6. Brexistence: The fact or state of living or continued survival of Britain (UK) or the British after Brexit. (MacMillan Dictionary)

7. Brexecution: The resulting conversational punishment received when disagreeing with a supporter of the Brexit movement. (Urban dictionary)

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