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Anger over car going nowhere

PUBLISHED: 21:00 27 May 2002 | UPDATED: 12:00 03 March 2010

FOR nearly eight months this car has remained in the same spot in Ipswich unattended to, unused and apparently unwanted.

But every time the authorities try to move it, the vehicle's owner steps forward to claim it – and it stays firmly in neutral!

Now, however, Ipswich Council is getting tough and has given the owner an ultimatum – move it within two weeks or it will be taken to a car pound and will have to pay a fee to get it removed.

FOR nearly eight months this car has remained in the same spot in Ipswich unattended to, unused and apparently unwanted.

But every time the authorities try to move it, the vehicle's owner steps forward to claim it – and it stays firmly in neutral!

Now, however, Ipswich Council is getting tough and has given the owner an ultimatum – move it within two weeks or it will be taken to a car pound and will have to pay a fee to get it removed.

The Citroen first appeared at the end of Violet Close in September last year and gradually became increasingly frustrating for people living in the street where parking is a problem.

It was reported to both the police and the council and reassurances were given that everything possible to move the car would be done.

However, residents were left continually contacting the council to find out what progress had been made in getting the car removed.

At one point they were reporting the car on a fortnightly basis.

One resident explained: "At Easter the general feeling was that something would be done soon and the car removed. I can confirm that this is not the case.

"The car is still sat on the verge, which is council property, and is generally being a nuisance for other residents as parking is an issue in Violet Close.

"As far as I am aware the car has been reported to the council again – I believe this makes it seven times since October last year – and the council are still reluctant to move it."

The car has been claimed by its owner and although it was initially untaxed – a criminal offence because it is on public land – it was re-taxed in November.

As such if the council had impounded the car, it could have faced allegations of theft.

However, the car is now believed to be without a valid tax disk again – and the council is planning to take the opportunity to swoop.

An Ipswich council spokesman said: "This is a difficult case in that

the car is not abandoned but has been claimed by the owner.

"However, we want to tell the owner quite clearly that if he does not remove this vehicle on to his own land we are going to take it to a pound where he will have to pay if he wants it back.

"The Council is shifting around 100 cars a month and we want to clear as many as possible: with the public's help we are winning the war against abandoned cars.

"If anyone knows of a problem call our Cleaner Ipswich Hotline – 433000."

Ironically the car itself, a Citroen XM, is considered highly collectable by some motoring enthusiasts – if it is restored to top condition.


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