Arts festival to set pulses racing

FROM theatre and comedy to dance, music and storytelling, an annual festival celebrating new and upcoming performers is set to get under way this month.

FROM theatre and comedy to dance, music and storytelling, an annual festival celebrating new and upcoming performers is set to get under way this month.

The Pulse Fringe Festival is now in its sixth year and is organised by the New Wolsey Theatre with support from the Arts Council, Suffolk County Council and Ipswich Borough Council.

The festival is held to give newcomers the chance to perform in professional venues with support to help them kick start their careers.

A launch event was held at the New Wolsey's St George's Street studio yesterday and a number of performers who will be taking part gave a sneak preview of some of the shows on offer.

Festival organiser Lynn Whitehead said it gave artists a good start to their career.

“Looking back over the past festivals, I'm proud that it has provided the very first step onto the escalator for many performers. In the current climate where instant celebrities rule, it's easy to forget that some people weren't born famous, they started small with a good idea and it grew and grew until the rest of the world caught up with them. Pulse is about championing those who are just starting out and who are growing.”

Most Read

Some performers who will appear on the Pulse programme also performed at the launch, including dance group Sin Cru, Ipswich based theatre company Woven, musician Hannah Scott and comedians Hugh Hughes and double act Cranberry Juice.

Cranberry Juice are Phil Deguara and Mark Curtis, who will be performing a show looking at the growing culture of binge drinking. The pair dress as clowns for the show and will be touring pubs and bars in Ipswich ahead of the show to gather material.

“It will be a collection of stories gather from the people of Ipswich,” said Phil.

“We will be speaking to people to find out their experiences and stories of times they have been drunk and the journey of getting there. Being dressed as clowns is about representing the ways people change when they are drunk and how they shake of their inhibitions and put on a new mask.”

But the show won't be written to make a judgement on drunkenness, added Mark.

“We know it happens and people do it, and we want to ask people for their stories and have some fun with it, if we upset people then we'll be upset, we're not trying to preach.”

The Pulse Fringe Festival will run from March 31 to June 24 at venues throughout Ipswich.

Is Pulse a good idea? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or send us an e-mail to eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter