Asbestos toll keeps rising

ASBESTOS has today been blamed for causing the deaths of three Suffolk workers.As revealed in The Evening Star on Saturday , strict new legislation, to protect employees from the dangers of asbestos, has been introduced.

ASBESTOS has today been blamed for causing the deaths of three Suffolk workers.

As revealed in The Evening Star on Saturday , strict new legislation, to protect employees from the dangers of asbestos, has been introduced.

Problems caused by asbestos have been highlighted by the Star's Silent Killer campaign.

Around half a million buildings around Britain still contain asbestos and the number of people dying from mesothelioma, a cancer of the lung lining caused by inhaling the fibres, is increasing.


You may also want to watch:


George Rous, , 73 of Falmouth Close, Kesgrave, died on May 3 and the inquest, held at Ipswich Crown Court, heard that he had worked cutting up asbestos sheets.

Mr Rous, had died from mesothelioma and east Suffolk deputy coroner Roger Stewart said contact with Asbestos had caused the cancer.

Most Read

Mr Stewart said: "It is quite clear there is evidence that Mr Rous was suffering from mesothelioma which killed him in due course.

"Mesothelioma is directly linked with asbestos and it is quite clear this man came into contact with it during his working life."

Alan Mason, 66, of Gladstone Road, Ipswich had worked in the building trade, stripping guttering and using materials that contained asbestos.

He died in Ipswich Hospital on February 20 and a post-mortem examination revealed he had also been suffering from mesothelioma.

Iris Cook, 80, of Cardiff Avenue, Ipswich, died on February 29 after developing mesothelioma.

Her husband had worked on the construction of the Cliff Quay power station and he had worked directly with asbestos.

Mr Stewart added: "It has been recognised in the past that the dust has travelled on the clothing of people in such industries and been transmitted unknowingly to other members of the family."

Mr Stewart recorded verdicts of death by industrial disease in the inquests of Mr Rous, Mr Mason and Mrs Cook.

A verdict of industrial disease was ruled out at a fourth inquest, even though there was substantial evidence the man concerned had worked with asbestos.

Samuel Legg, 77, of Raeburn Road, Ipswich, died at the town's hospital on January 21 following treatment for a carcinoma of the lung.

After serving in the armed forces, Mr Legg had worked as a painter for 30 years, and, although he did not directly work with asbestos, he was regularly exposed to it.

Mr Legg was judged to have died from natural causes.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus