Baby Daniel is light of family's life

BABY Daniel Raistrick brought light into the lives of his family - when his mum gave birth in the middle of a night-time power cut.And his mum and dad Justina and James Raistrick have today thanked the EDF engineers who saved the day when she went into labour in the middle of a night-time power cut.

BABY Daniel Raistrick brought light into the lives of his family - when his mum gave birth in the middle of a night-time power cut.

And his mum and dad Justina and James Raistrick have today thanked the EDF engineers who saved the day when she went into labour in the middle of a night-time power cut.

The 20-year-old had been planning to give birth to her third child at her Victoria Street flat in Ipswich, but was left in the pitch black when part of the town was plunged into darkness.

However, quick-thinking electricity engineers dashed into action to save the day when the ambulance service called EDF Energy.

Ian Clarke, 39, took two super-powerful lights to the woman's home enabling medics to deliver a healthy baby, while colleague David Robinson continued to fix the fault.

Today, Mrs Raistrick thanked Mr Clarke for his help - and told of her astonishment at new-born Daniel's unusual arrival.

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The 20-year-old, married to James, 24, said: “As soon as I went into labour, I rang the hospital to ask for a midwife to come out to me.

“I was rushing about packing a bag for hospital, but the midwife told me to stay where I was because I was already well dilated. Then, all of a sudden the lights went off.

“At first I thought it was just my electrics which had gone.

“The paramedics turned up and then an electrician did, too.

“We had candles lit to provide some light but then the electrician arrived with the lights, which was great.

“It was a bit mad although I managed not to panic.”

Matt Ware, from the East of England Ambulance Service, said paramedics were called to the scene at 3.44am overnight on November 7 and quickly realised a supply of light was urgently required.

He said: “When we arrived at the address it was clear that delivery was imminent and that we desperately needed light.

“Within a few minutes the EDF Energy engineer who was working at the substation nearby arrived with high-powered torches and we were able to help the patient give birth to a healthy baby boy.

“The response from EDF Energy was brilliant and it would have been very difficult indeed without their help.”

Baby Daniel arrived soon after, weighing in at 7lb 14oz

Full-time mum Mrs Raistrick said: “Daniel is very tiring, but he's healthy and very well.”

She said despite the bizarre episode, she had not been put off home birth.

She added: “My four-year-old was born at hospital, but my one-year-old was delivered at home and I would definitely risk it again - despite what happened this time.”

Have you given birth in dramatic circumstances? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk

HERO electrician Ian Clarke today admitted he had never been involved in anything as dramatic as assisting in the birth of a baby.

Mr Clarke, who works in Ipswich but lives in the Colchester area, said: “The flat was in total darkness and it was clearly difficult for the midwife and ambulance service to work.

“I gave them two high beam torches that lit the room up as though it was daylight.

“I waited outside to check all was OK then headed back to the substation to continue work.”

Mr Clarke went back to the flat when repairs were completed at the substation and supplies were restored.

The ambulance service was packing up and told him that a healthy baby boy had been delivered at 4.38am.

He said: “I have worked for the company for 18 years but have never been part of anything like that before - well other than at the delivery of my own children.

“I know childbirth can be a nerve-racking experience anyway so was only too pleased to help out in this small way.”

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