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Ipswich roofing company to donate £20,000 to charity after breaking recycling rules

PUBLISHED: 07:30 21 June 2019 | UPDATED: 08:35 21 June 2019

Bauder have voluntarily given almost £20,000 to charities after they reported themselves to the Environment Agency for breaching recycling regulations Picture: GOOGLE MAPS

Bauder have voluntarily given almost £20,000 to charities after they reported themselves to the Environment Agency for breaching recycling regulations Picture: GOOGLE MAPS

GOOGLE MAPS

An Ipswich roofing company has offered to pay nearly £20,000 to two environmental charities after failing to follow recycling rules for 16 years.

Bauder Ltd, of Landseer Road, Ipswich, reported itself to the Environment Agency in November 2015 when it appeared to be infringing the Producer Responsibility Obligations (Packaging Waste) Regulations 2007.

Agency officers found that Bauder had failed to register under the regulations and failed to "take reasonable steps" to recycle it's waste for 16 years.

Because the business reported this to the agency and this was a first-time offence, they were offered the chance to make a charitable donation rather than face legal action - called an enforcement undertaking.

Bauder offered to give £10,000 to Suffolk Wildlife Trust to restore 1,000 acres of Carlton Marshes nature reserve, plus £9,377.42 to Buglife, a charity making wildflower meadows in East Anglia.

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Julian Roughton, chief executive of Suffolk Wildlife Trust, said: "The restoration of this special corner of East Anglia will bring rich rewards not just for Suffolk's wildlife but also for the local economy.

"The 1,000 acres of reedbed, fen and wetland scrapes will support some of East Anglia's iconic species such as fen raft spider, marsh harrier, bittern and crane."

Paul Hetherington, director of fundraising and communications at Buglife, said the money had "plugged the remaining funding" gap in its Urban Buzz project.

He said: "In total 944 sites covering more than 325 hectares of pollinator-friendly habitat were completed with just under 12,000 volunteers positively engaged in the work. Without this vital contribution almost 10% of this work would have gone unfinished."

Senior technical officer at the Environment Agency, Nikki Collins, said: "Enforcement undertakings allow those who commit offences to stop offending, come into compliance and to take steps to prevent a recurrence.

"When appropriate, they allow a quicker resolution than a prosecution and help offenders who are prepared to take responsibility for their actions to put things right voluntarily, in a way that directly benefits the environment and local communities."

Bauder declined to comment on the donations.

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