Becky saves bridesmaid's life

BECKY Hudson is being hailed as a heroine after saving her eight-year-old bridesmaid from drowning in mountainous seas while on her honeymoon.Becky, of Baker Road, Shotley, today told of the drama, which almost claimed to life of little Georgia Whayman just off Mauritius.

BECKY Hudson is being hailed as a heroine after saving her eight-year-old bridesmaid from drowning in mountainous seas while on her honeymoon.

Becky, of Baker Road, Shotley, today told of the drama, which almost claimed the life of little Georgia Whayman just off Mauritius.

Having tied the knot with husband Alan less than a week earlier, Becky was one of six people thrown into the choppy waters when their speedboat overturned off the south-east coast of Africa.

Husband Alan helplessly watched the drama unfold from another boat as Suffolk County Council clerk Becky emerged a real heroine after saving non-swimmer Georgia from drowning under the 15ft high waves.

It could have been much worse. As Georgia said to her relieved mum, Tracy: "Mum, you nearly lost all of us."

Becky (nee Gray) and husband Alan were part of a 23-strong group which had travelled out to Mauritius for the wedding.

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After more than half the party had flown home, their start to married life took its unexpected twist when eight of the ten people who remained on the island republic decided to go for rides in two speedboats.

Becky, 31, went in one boat with three friends, Pat Rosewell, 49, of Blake Avenue, Shotley Gate and Tracy Whayman, 39, of Ganges Road, Shotley, as well as Karen Wright, 30, of Victoria Street, Ipswich.

Also in the boat was Tracy's eight-year-old daughter Georgia and a local skipper. Felixstowe port worker Alan, 36, went in another boat with two pals and a skipper.

Becky said: "We had gone out on a dolphin-watching trip and everything was going well. A big wave knocked Karen out of our boat into the water.

"As the boat turned sharply to swing round and pick her up, we quickly realised that we were all going in.

"The boat flipped over as the waves were 15ft high and we were pushed around in the water. The boat somehow tipped back over and sped off as the six of us were pushed towards a coral reef.

"I just had time to grab hold of Georgia after hearing her mum saying, 'Oh my God, we're going in'.

"We were all thrown into the sea and were desperately trying to stay afloat as we were buffeted around by these huge waves.

"After a while I could feel my strength slipping away and I was only holding on to Georgia by her t-shirt.

"But I knew she would have no chance of survival if I let go so I grimly hung on to her as my friends and I were buffeted by the waves.

"Tracy was absolutely hysterical in the water because she was convinced that Georgia had drowned.

"We were half a mile away from the shore, which was a bit scary.

"The reason the waves were so high was because they break over the coral reefs, so they actually worked well for us and pushed us towards the coral, where it's much calmer."

"We didn't really have much control over where we were heading and I certainly know how clothes feel in a washing machine!"

While the four women, Georgia and their skipper struggled to keep above water, the skipper in the men's boat went to their rescue.

All were taken to hospital, apart from Becky, with Karen suffering fluid on the knee, although no one was seriously injured.

Becky said: "We all ended up with cuts and bruises from the coral and we had spikes from sea urchins in our feet. I also managed to get a black eye in the process.

"Georgia kept us all going after the accident as it was a big adventure for her."

School assistant Tracy said: "I know that Georgia would have drowned if it had not been for Becky grabbing hold of her as the boat went over.

"She is just an absolute hero for saving Georgia's life. I don't know how I will ever be able to repay her."

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