Search

Bird is one of the family

PUBLISHED: 14:00 17 June 2002 | UPDATED: 12:07 03 March 2010

IT was a featherless, orphan baby bird which was close to death.

But thanks to the loving care of a Suffolk couple, what is now a beautiful greenfinch survived, and a year later is making their plant pots her own.

IT was a featherless, orphan baby bird which was close to death.

But thanks to the loving care of a Suffolk couple, what is now a beautiful greenfinch survived, and a year later is making their plant pots her own.

When David Stringer and his wife Pat were handed an abandoned baby bird found among the lawn cuttings they never dreamed it would become their lodger.

But now the little greenfinch, who was found when she was only days old, has been living with the couple for more than a year.

She has really made her mark in the house and her choice of home is rather unusual.

Nestling among their artificial pot plants is the place she calls home. The bird has made a nest of old slippers, moss and wool lovingly woven together and perched on top of the shiny plastic leaves.

"It was my son who found it when he was cutting the lawn and he brought it round to us," said 60-year-old Mr Stringer.

"We never thought it would survive as it was found with another bird which had died. It had no feathers and we used to have to feed it using a match and special food. We started to give her moss and bits of wool to make a nest with and she even took the lining from my wife's slippers," he laughed.

"Now she is sitting on four eggs and while they will be no good it is a sign of contentment that she has produced them. She follows me everywhere and she really has become part of the family," added Mr Stringer of Trinity Walk, Stowupland.

The bird, who does not have a name, has been given free reign throughout the house and Mr Stringer said he can not imagine living without her.

"Me and my wife are both animal lovers and she really is part of the furniture. She comes and sits on my shoulder and she is so tame that you can leave the door or window open and she will not even try to get out. I think she is quite scared of the outside world. I used to breed Canaries so I had some experience with birds which came in handy.

"When she was first brought to us there was no way I thought she would survive but now she is lovely and I would not be without her," he said.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Ipswich Star

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists