Black history revisited in film

BLACK History Month is bringing culture and diversity to the community.Through film, theatre and art it is bringing us some of the most important figures in black history.

By Victoria Knowles

BLACK History Month is bringing culture and diversity to the community.

Through film, theatre and art it is bringing us some of the most important figures in black history. Their stories capture a moment in time, a single act or a journey of great importance which still effects us today.

The Ipswich Film Theatre is playing host to some of these figures when they show two films depicting the remarkable lives of Marcus Garvey and Rosa Parks.


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Dave Gregory, Films Officer, at Ipswich Film Theatre said: "Ipswich Film Theatre is delighted to be contributing to Black History Month for the third year in succession.

"As a cultural cinema with strong roots in the local community we are committed to screening films from all countries and cultures and feel it is of vital importance that different voices are heard and alternative perspectives seen.

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"I hope that people from all sections of the community will take the opportunity to come and see the films, not just to learn but also to experience a pair of very different but highly enjoyable movies," he said.

BIOGS

Rosa Parks

Most historians date the beginning of the modern civil rights movement in America as December 1 1955.

The day an unknown seamstress from Montgomery, Alabama refused to give up her bus seat to a white passenger.

Rose Parks was arrested and fined. This lonely act of defiance began a movement which ended legal segregation in America and made her an inspiration to freedom loving people every where.

Born in Tuskegee, Alabama on February 4 1913 she moved to Michigan in 1957 to escape harassment.

In 1999 she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Marcus Garvey 1887-1940

In his lifetime he was hailed as a prophet and redeemer by black people across the world.

He is best remembered as a pivotal figure in the struggle for racial equality throughout the world.

He founded the Universal Negro Improvements Association (UNIA) and championed the back to Africa movements of the 1920s.

Born in Jamaica in 1887 he left to work in Costa Rica. It was while working in central America that he experienced the harsh realities of racial discrimination.

His legacy makes him an inspirational figure for many civil rights leaders and politicians today.

Look for me in the Whirlwind, which depicts the life of Marcus Garvey will be showing on October 14 and the Rosa Parks Story will be showing on October 23 at 6.30pm.

For more information please call the box office on Ipswich 433100.

www.bfmfilmfestival.com

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