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Rowdy youths seen ‘jumping off bridge’ and littering beauty spot

PUBLISHED: 06:00 15 August 2020

Jason Alexander went to Bramford Meadows on Monday morning and found tons of rubbish along the river bank, thought to be left behind by large gatherings of young people. Picture: JASON ALEXANDER

Jason Alexander went to Bramford Meadows on Monday morning and found tons of rubbish along the river bank, thought to be left behind by large gatherings of young people. Picture: JASON ALEXANDER

Archant

Large groups of young people have been seen gathering at Bramford river, jumping off the bridge, crowding the roads and reportedly littering the riverbank.

Jason Alexander went to Bramford Meadows on Monday morning and found tons of rubbish along the riverbank, thought to be left behind by large gatherings of young people. Picture: JASON ALEXANDERJason Alexander went to Bramford Meadows on Monday morning and found tons of rubbish along the riverbank, thought to be left behind by large gatherings of young people. Picture: JASON ALEXANDER

Jason Alexander, founder of Rubbish Walks, went to Bramford Meadows on Monday, August 10 after a long hot weekend of sunny weather, only to find several bags-worth of rubbish.

Masks, beer cans and disposable barbecues were among the discarded waste.

Mr Alexander had been to the area on Sunday evening and reported seeing a group of 30 to 40 young people, aged between 15 and 25, drinking and jumping off the bridge with no visible signs of social distancing.

Returning to litter pick at 6am the next day, he said: “The sheer volume of littering is really the problem, I found so much in the river and on the riverbank, which seems to have come from the young crowd.

Residents of Bramford believe the increase in littering is due to the crowds of young people attending the riverbank on hot days. Picture: JASON ALEXANDERResidents of Bramford believe the increase in littering is due to the crowds of young people attending the riverbank on hot days. Picture: JASON ALEXANDER

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“It is just a total lack of responsibility and the jumping off Bramford Bridge is dangerous.”

Police officers attended the meadows on Saturday, August 8, after reports that a group of people were jumping off the bridge into the river in Mill Lane, Bramford.

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Over the period of a month a garden fence along the riverbank was damaged as a result of being climbed over and an officer gave words of advice to the group following several incidents.

A spokesman for Bramford Open Spaces, a charitable company which runs the meadows on behalf of the council, said: “This influx of people to the area is an issue as they’re coming from outside of Bramford, from areas such as Ipswich, as lockdown has eased and they’ve gone berserk enjoying themselves.

“We litter pick in the morning and by 5pm the place is trashed, I just don’t understand the mentality of people coming for a day out and leaving their rubbish behind.”

Claire Reeves lives in Bramford with her husband and two children. She says that while people jumping off the bridge is nothing new, the situation has escalated this summer as people seek alternative places to visit while remaining outdoors and close to home.

“They’re all off school and come down nearly every hot day from around 11am onwards,” she said.

“They’re crowding the area and will stand on the bridge in big groups, not letting anyone through, even cycling in the road five abreast and causing cars to stop in the road.

“There is a total lack of empathy for locals and they seem to be in a world of their own.”

Mrs Reeves says the groups of young adults can often be found loitering in the nearby country roads or cycling in large groups, posing potential danger for motorists.

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