Brighter new year hope for David

A NEW Year means a new start for disabled man David Marshall, who is now looking forward to a life beyond his four walls.Mr Marshall, a desperately lonely 59-year-old wheelchair-user who lives in Adams Place, Grange Farm, Kesgrave, wanted to spend Christmas with friends in his former Essex private care home but could not afford the weekly fees of £730 himself.

A NEW Year means a new start for disabled man David Marshall, who is now looking forward to a life beyond his four walls.

Mr Marshall, a desperately lonely 59-year-old wheelchair-user who lives in Adams Place, Grange Farm, Kesgrave, wanted to spend Christmas with friends in his former Essex private care home but could not afford the weekly fees of £730 himself.

Although some other friends picked him up on Christmas Eve and insisted he spend the festive season at their home in Essex, he had to be dropped back after an hour as he became upset when his wheelchair would not fit through the bathroom door. He then spent Christmas and New Year's Eve alone.

However since The Evening Star got in touch with Suffolk County Council, a representative from

adult and community services has been to visit Mr Marshall and given him a glimmer of hope for the future.

Mr Marshall said: “This woman told me that I could move into sheltered accommodation in Stowmarket for disabled people my age. I would have people there 24 hours a day, and I would not be so lonely.

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“She also talked about getting someone to take me for a drive or a wander around the area to get me out.

“I had given up any hope of anything happening but this lady did seem genuine. She also said she would fight to get me a brief stay at Mid Meadows.”

Mr Marshall, originally from Nottingham, lost both his legs following serious blood clots in his arteries, caused by a 40-a-day smoking habit.

He moved into Mid Meadows after his first amputation in 2003, and was then moved to an adapted property in Colchester, and later, Kesgrave. The amputation of his second leg this year has plunged him into depression again, and a carer coming in twice a day is the only company he gets as panic attacks prevent him from venturing outside.

He added: “My friends were very kind and didn't want me to be on my own at Christmas but I think I spoilt the whole day for them. I had to leave.

“I just watched television all day on Christmas Day. I kept breaking down because everything was about Christmas.”

Graham Newman, Suffolk County councillor for adult and community services, said: “We promised to look into Mr Marshall's circumstances before Christmas and I'm very pleased to say that it seems we have found a solution to his liking.”

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