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Zoo welcomes arrival of second adorable baby giraffe

PUBLISHED: 08:55 30 October 2020 | UPDATED: 11:10 30 October 2020

The new arrival at Africa Alive!. Pic: supplied

The new arrival at Africa Alive!. Pic: supplied

Archant

Welcome to the world! Keepers at Africa Alive! in Suffolk are delighted after the birth of a second baby giraffe in less than a month.

The new arrival at Africa Alive!. Pic: suppliedThe new arrival at Africa Alive!. Pic: supplied

The zoo, sister to Banham Zoo near Diss, which is run by the Zoological Society of East Anglia, said the female calf was delivered without any complications on Friday October 23 at around 5.30pm.

Although this is mother Kiara’s second calf, for the first three days following the birth, keepers were not convinced that she was letting the calf feed properly, so took the decision to supplement the feed using gold-top milk. However, she now appears to be back on track and is once again proving to be an excellent mother.

This is the second birth at the zoo in under a month, with a male reticulated giraffe calf being born just 17 days prior to mother Kibibi.

Prior to these two new calves, Kibibi was actually the last giraffe born at Africa Alive! on July 26, 2014 to mother Kiara. This new addition makes Kiara both a mother and grandmother at the same time.

Kiara arrived at Africa Alive! from Cologne Zoo in Germany, whilst father Jengo came from Amsterdam zoo in The Netherlands, arriving at Africa Alive! on the 2nd July 2019.

Terry Hornsey, animal manager at Africa Alive, said: “The birth of a giraffe is always good news, but two being born so close together is fantastic news for all the keepers and staff at Africa Alive.

“The keepers have shown incredible patience, dedication and expertise since the female calf was born, ensuring that she has still been able to get the nutrients she needs through supplement feeding, whilst at the same time, encouraging mother Kiara to allow her new calf to feed naturally. The calf is now looking much stronger and is feeding properly from her mother.”

There are nine different sub-species of giraffe, one of which is the reticulated giraffe which can be found in the wild in the arid areas of North and East Africa. With an IUCN Red List status of ‘Endangered’, it has been estimated that fewer than 11,000 mature individuals were known to be living in the wild at the end of 2018 (from an estimated 28,000 as recently as the late 1990s).


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