St Elizabeth Hospice and Ipswich Town Academy benefit from first book

Felixstowe businessman David Ablitt presents a cheque for �1,000 to Fiona Ginn, partnerships fundrai

Felixstowe businessman David Ablitt presents a cheque for �1,000 to Fiona Ginn, partnerships fundraiser at St Elizabeth Hospice. The donation is from proceeds of the sale of his first book, Howda Towan Git On - about his schooldays in Ipswich. - Credit: Archant

Felixstowe businessman David makes £1,0000 donation to the hospice

Ipswich Town fan David Ablitt has written his first book, Howda Towan Git On? with a foreword by Tow

Ipswich Town fan David Ablitt has written his first book, Howda Towan Git On? with a foreword by Town legend Ray Crawford. They were sigining copies of the book at Portman Road on Saturday. - Credit: Archant

Felixstowe businessman David Ablitt made a trip to St Elizabeth Hospice to present a cheque for £1,000 to the Ipswich based charity.

David, managing director of Imorex Shipping Services, presented proceeds from his first novel, Howda Towan Git On, about his school days as an Ipswich Town fan and growing up in Ipswich.

David, who lived in the Castle Hill area of Ipswich when he was a schoolboy, and went to Thurleston High School, has sold more than 800 copies of his book, which has a foreword by former Ipswich Town star Ray Crawford, one of his sporting heroes.

David said: “I was very pleased to be able to make a donation St Elizabeth Hospice, My dad, Keith Ablitt, died in the hospice in 1991 and I am grateful to them,.

“I have also been able to make a donation of £400 to the Ipswich Town Academy and another £500 is going to Ray Crawford’s chosen cancer charity in Portsmouth.

“Ray has been very helpful to me.”

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Dave Ablitt spent around seven years writing ‘Howda Towan Git On’ – but having the work published came quite by chance.

Having read a similar book while on holiday and feeling he could do better, he started collecting his thoughts and experiences of following Ipswich Town and growing up in the town in the 1960s.

After a few coincidental encounters with old teachers and friends he was persuaded to send it to publishers who took it up almost immediately.

“I didn’t write it with the intention of ever having it published, I never ever considered that it would be anywhere near good enough,” Mr Ablitt said.

“I think it helped in the writing that I was absolutely Ipswich Town FC daft and they had total influence on my life until I left school and had to grow up.”

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