Cannabis still a danger

ONCE again the dangers of using cannabis have been shown by the tragic story of Ipswich teenager Jack Sheppard.The 17-year-old died after taking a overdose of the sedatives he had been prescribed to overcome the psychosis he had developed as a result of his use of the “recreational” drug.

ONCE again the dangers of using cannabis have been shown by the tragic story of Ipswich teenager Jack Sheppard.

The 17-year-old died after taking a overdose of the sedatives he had been prescribed to overcome the psychosis he had developed as a result of his use of the “recreational” drug.

But the real cause of his death was the damage regular use of cannabis had done to his young, and still-developing, brain.

Not everyone who uses cannabis will suffer mental problems - but a significant minority can have these problems and the danger is increased for those who start using the drug at a young age.

It is for these reasons that the government was right to reclassify cannabis from a grade C to a grade B drug - a sign that it regards its use as much more serious.

And that is why it is right that the police should crack down heavily on those who are cultivating strong cannabis - or skunk - in home-made factories.

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The drugs that they are producing aren't necessarily providing a bit of harmless recreation for old hippies, they can cause major long-term health problems and even death for unsuspecting users.

The hearts of people everywhere will today go out to the family of tragic Jack Sheppard - his story is a powerful reminder of why cannabis can be so dangerous.

IPSWICH Buses is a highly-regarded, well-run Suffolk company which has always been very responsive to the needs of its passengers.

There will be widespread sadness through the area at the loss of the contract to provide park and ride services for Ipswich . . . and at the fear about what effect this will have on its other bus services.

If the county ends up paying tens of thousands to subsidise uneconomic services because of the loss of the park and ride contract, how will that benefit council taxpayers?

And if - by saving a small amount of money - thousands of people are left without a bus service, how does that make life better in Ipswich?

Ipswich Buses' losing the park and ride contract might save the council a few thousand pounds . . . but it could cost the earth in Suffolk's county town.

TOWN fans clearly have faith that Marcus Evans' millions can transform their team as season ticket sales seem to be racing ahead in anticipation of the 2008/9 season.

Bosses at Portman Road are now confident that 15,000 season tickets will have been sold by the time Preston come to play in the first match in August.

That is an impressive figure for a club about to start its seventh consecutive season in second-tier football, its longest-ever spell at this level.

The fans will all be hoping that seven does prove to be the magic number, and that Magilton's developing managerial skills will merged with Marcus' millions to produce a team which can finally return to football's Premier League.

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