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Cash boost for primary schools

PUBLISHED: 15:34 04 December 2001 | UPDATED: 10:58 03 March 2010

HEADTEACHERS today welcomed news that primary schools in Suffolk are set to receive a £2.3 million cash injection.

The money, from the government's standards fund, is intended to boost literacy and numeracy work.

HEADTEACHERS today welcomed news that primary schools in Suffolk are set to receive a £2.3 million cash injection.

The money, from the government's standards fund, is intended to boost literacy and numeracy work.

News of the grant – part of a national £192m sum – comes on the eve of the publication of this year's primary school league tables.

However, reports to be published today by Ofsted were expected to be critical of the quality of some numeracy and literacy teaching – while Chief Inspector of Schools, Mike Tomlinson, warned the continuing crisis in teacher recruitment may be affecting pupil achievement.

Ann Taylor, headteacher of Whitton Primary in Ipswich, which received an achievement award from the government earlier this year, welcomed the cash grant: "This is wonderful news. We will always need support and help with these core subjects."

She said she would use more money for extra staff and new initiatives. "Teaching through small group work is the way forward for us and extra money will do this. Money could also be used for schools to work together."

Duncan Bathgate, headteacher of Bealings School, which has been recognised as one of the government's Beacon schools, said: "This will really help to improve the quality of the work that is going on, particularly in writing."

The local education authority also welcomed the extra cash. Moira Jackson, education communications manager for Suffolk County Council, said: "This money will help us to support schools as they build on the good work that is already under way in literacy and numeracy."

However, Mr Tomlinson warned today on Radio 4's 'Today' programme that teacher shortages – which have hit hard in Suffolk – were affecting the drive to raise standards.

"There have been significant changes of staffing over the year and that has in a sense affected the continuity of teaching and might well have affected the achievement of pupils," he said


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