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Celebration for diamond couple

PUBLISHED: 10:22 31 May 2002 | UPDATED: 12:01 03 March 2010

SWEET sixteen was their ages, when Eric and Peggy Minter first met.

The couple who became inseparable, celebrated their diamond wedding yesterday , having known each other for over 63 years.

SWEET sixteen was their ages, when Eric and Peggy Minter first met.

The couple who became inseparable, celebrated their diamond wedding yesterday , having known each other for over 63 years.

Peggy was friends with Eric's sister, who invited Eric to join them as they cycled over to Waldringfield to watch the boats.

But when asked if it was love at first sight, they both lauhged and said "No! The relationship developed over time."

Now they say the secret of a happy marriage is give and take.

"I couldn't say that there's a golden rule, as you can't compare with other marriages," said Eric.

"Mum – I always call Peggy Mum – and I are just very comfortable together. We almost never go anywhere without the other. I think we're joined at the hip!" he joked.

"We have arguments of course – we almost had one this morning!"

They both laughed. "But it's always cleared up again in five minutes."

The couple married in 1942, and have lived in their house in Whitton since 1947.

They have three children, Kenneth, Margaret and David, nine grandchildren, and three great grandchildren with two more on the way. One of their great grandchildren is young burns survivor Terri Calvesbert.

Peggy said: "That's such a terrible shame. She shouldn't really have survived according to the doctors, but now she has she's here to stay. She's got such a wonderful mind."

Eric added: "Now she's at school we don't see her as much as we used to, but she lives only about 50 yards away, so Paul brings her round quite regularly."

Eric and Peggy's life together has spanned some big changes in the community. Eric began his career in the forces, where he spent time in Ireland, France and Denmark. When he left the forces, he cycled to work at Cranes.

He then spent most of his life working on the milk round, starting with a horse and cart and finishing with a modern electric float.

"The horse was easier," he said.

"It would follow you up the road, so you didn't have to keep getting out and getting in again every time you stopped. Mind you, one time it bolted and galloped right away! They gave me the electric one after that."

Peggy had various jobs over the years, including working at Churchman's. Before retiring aged 60, she spent fourteen years working for BHS in Ipswich.

The couple's anniversary celebration took place in the Barking Fox pub, where 25 of their friends and family joined them.


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