Compensation battle goes on

AN Ipswich man's 20-year battle for compensation following a government mistake has reached a standstill in the political corridors of Westminster.The Evening Star told the story of Colin - not his real name - a man with haemophilia, who contracted HIV and Hepatitis from contaminated blood bought by the NHS, last week.

AN Ipswich man's 20-year battle for compensation following a government mistake has reached a standstill in the political corridors of Westminster.

The Evening Star told the story of Colin - not his real name - a man with haemophilia, who contracted HIV and Hepatitis from contaminated blood bought by the NHS, last week.

His, and 4,670 other sufferers', plight was the subject of the Archer Report published at the start of this month.

But, despite the independent inquiry calling for action, the government have still not responded to the issue - despite calls for more compensation to be paid.


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“All we want is some form of closure, some form of acknowledgment but we've still not heard anything,” said Colin.

“I've had to live with this for 20 years. I've had close friends dying around me - we're talking about one a month now. Families are being decimated by it.”

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More than 1,750 have died from treatment with 'tainted blood' in the 1970s and 80s in what the report called “a horrific human tragedy.”

A copy of the findings was delivered to the Prime Minister by the Haemophilia Society on Monday.

Since the findings of the Archer report were delivered, questions have been asked in both Houses of Parliament.

An early day motion, designed to raise awareness on the issue, has also been established and attracted the signature of 64 MPs.

Campaigners are hopeful for a government debate although no date has yet been set.

Tim Yeo, MP for South Suffolk, said he was contacted by a constituent shortly after the release of the report.

“My view is that the Department of Health should have taken part in the inquiry,” he said. “It is also true that at the time contaminated blood was bought the government was unaware of the risks it was carrying.

“I rarely add my signature to an early day motion. In my past dealings I have found that direct contact with the minister is the best way to express a view.”

Chris Mole, MP for Ipswich, is unable to sign early day motions as he is currently an Assistant Government Whip.

He was also unable to comment on the issue for the same reason.

However Mr Mole expressed great sympathy with the case has spoken to the health minister personally about the findings.

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