Complaints over safety improvements

HIGHWAYS engineers are examining film of congestion at the Seven Hills interchange after complaints that their safety improvements have made it dangerous.

HIGHWAYS engineers are examining film of congestion at the Seven Hills interchange after complaints that their safety improvements have made it dangerous.

Suffolk County Council took over the A12-A14 junction and the A12 dual carriageway leading from Nacton to Martlesham nearly two years ago.

The roundabout beneath the flyover had always worked smoothly, though there was major congestion in the rush-hour.

Engineers then authorised a series of alterations to the A12 approach from Martlesham and Brightwell to improve safety and the operation of the junction, but many drivers say this has increased the problems.

The left-hand lane is now for Felixstowe-bound traffic only, with all other traffic ordered into the right-lane, while the roundabout has been reduced to one lane.

This has slowed entry to the roundabout and caused frustration confusion and congestion for people who have left the Ipswich-bound A14, especially as many drivers do not indicate while using the interchange.

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Trimley councillor Susan Ring said: "It is a very dangerous roundabout indeed. People do not indicate if they are going to Nacton or if they are going round and turning right onto the A14 and you can wait a long time.

"It is quite lethal and someone is going to pull out and there will be an accident."

County councillor Patricia O'Brien said many people were concerned, especially residents of Bucklesham.

The hatched area on the roundabout was dangerous and there had been a number of near misses.

"The Bucklesham exit on the roundabout was always dangerous but is even more so now," she told Trimley St Mary Parish Council.

"People don't seem to see the exit at all and it is very difficult for drivers to get in across the hatching and out into the traffic.

"It has got worse since they did the improvements and I am keeping a very close eye on their investigations into the problem."

She said the highways department at County Hall was looking at the problem and is currently studying more than 12 hours of video film taken of the junction to help with the search for a solution.

Officers were also liaising with police and listening to their expert advice.

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