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Ipswich mum transforms daughter’s bedroom into sensory jungle during lockdown

PUBLISHED: 16:09 13 April 2020 | UPDATED: 17:15 13 April 2020

Aurora, aged 5, has the perfect bunk bed with safe steps built into it, making it safe for her to use with her visual impairment. Picture: JODIE EATON

Aurora, aged 5, has the perfect bunk bed with safe steps built into it, making it safe for her to use with her visual impairment. Picture: JODIE EATON

JODIE EATON

An Ipswich teacher has used her downtime during the coronavirus pandemic to create an incredible jungle bedroom for her visually impaired daughter whose birthday party was cancelled.

Aurora Eaton, who turns six on Thursday, April 23, was supposed to be having her dream party at a bakery with her friends but then the coronavirus lockdown came into force.

But now Aurora – who has a visual impairment called microphthalmia – is spending her evenings under the jungle stars thanks to her mother Jodie, who is a drama teacher at Copleston High School.

After Jodie told her daughter the bad news, Aurora asked her mum if she would create her dream jungle themed bedroom instead.

Mum Jodie has created the bedroom as a sensory room for Aurora, who has a visual impairment. Picture: JODIE EATONMum Jodie has created the bedroom as a sensory room for Aurora, who has a visual impairment. Picture: JODIE EATON

Speaking of the transformation, Jodie said: “That day I ordered all the bits online, including a special bunkbed with steps built in, which was something Aurora had always been desperate for because of her eye sight she hadn’t been able to have one with a ladder.”

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Jodie then stayed up all night painting so that the carpet could be fitted by a friend the next morning.

Mum Jodie has created the bedroom as a sensory room for Aurora - with twinkly lights and vines - to help create a space for the 5-year-old who is blind in one eye. Picture: JODIE EATONMum Jodie has created the bedroom as a sensory room for Aurora - with twinkly lights and vines - to help create a space for the 5-year-old who is blind in one eye. Picture: JODIE EATON

She has spent the last few weeks painting the animals onto Aurora’s walls – tackling one each day.

She wanted to create a sensory room for Aurora, who is blind in one eye and has reduced vision in the other.

Her daughter has one prosthetic eye, which is replaced and hand-painted with acrylic every six months at Moorfields Eye Hospital.

Mum Jodie has created the bedroom as a sensory room for Aurora - with twinkly lights and vines - to help create a space for the 5-year-old who is blind in one eye. Picture: JODIE EATONMum Jodie has created the bedroom as a sensory room for Aurora - with twinkly lights and vines - to help create a space for the 5-year-old who is blind in one eye. Picture: JODIE EATON

The twinkly lights, glow in the dark stars and the jungle vines through the net create an environment for Aurora to go and sit in, with mum Jodie explaining it is more than just a bedroom.

“Aurora absolutely loves her new room, it is such a nice place for her to be,” said Jodie. “She gives it a million out of 10.”

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Mum Jodie has created the bedroom as a sensory room for Aurora, who has a visual impairment. Picture: JODIE EATONMum Jodie has created the bedroom as a sensory room for Aurora, who has a visual impairment. Picture: JODIE EATON

Jodie shared pictures of the bedroom in a Facebook group which caters for families during lockdown.

Her post has received thousands of comments, with Jodie saying her “phone went mad” with people asking where things were from.

But Jodie says the best thing about the online response is that parents of children with microphthalmia have got in touch.

Mum Jodie has had hundreds of questions on social media about where she got the butterflies from - they were a purchase from Amazon. Picture: JODIE EATONMum Jodie has had hundreds of questions on social media about where she got the butterflies from - they were a purchase from Amazon. Picture: JODIE EATON

She said: “Some parents have recognised Aurora’s condition from the pictures and have been asking for advice on the process of prosthetic shells, which is a really lovely connection for us to have.”

More: Neighbours’ kids continue to play in lockdown through window in garden fence

Aurora, aged 5, has a room which now rivals her 7-year-old sister Madison's, which is a Disney princess theme. Picture: JODIE EATONAurora, aged 5, has a room which now rivals her 7-year-old sister Madison's, which is a Disney princess theme. Picture: JODIE EATON

Aurora loves animals and her mum Jodie, who is a drama teacher, painted all the designs on her bedroom walls. Picture: JODIE EATONAurora loves animals and her mum Jodie, who is a drama teacher, painted all the designs on her bedroom walls. Picture: JODIE EATON

Aurora Eaton, aged 5, loves the new room her parents created during lockdown as a birthday treat after her party had to be cancelled because of coronavirus. Picture: JODIE EATONAurora Eaton, aged 5, loves the new room her parents created during lockdown as a birthday treat after her party had to be cancelled because of coronavirus. Picture: JODIE EATON

Aurora loves animals and asked for a jungle bedroom as a birthday treat after coronavirus caused the cancellation of her birthday party. Picture: JODIE EATONAurora loves animals and asked for a jungle bedroom as a birthday treat after coronavirus caused the cancellation of her birthday party. Picture: JODIE EATON

Aurora loves animals and asked for a jungle bedroom as a birthday treat after coronavirus caused the cancellation of her birthday party. Picture: JODIE EATONAurora loves animals and asked for a jungle bedroom as a birthday treat after coronavirus caused the cancellation of her birthday party. Picture: JODIE EATON


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