Council to tackle Texas over execution

PLEAS failed to save his life, but protests over John "Jackie" Elliott's execution will certainly ensure he is not forgotten.Town councillors in his home town of Felixstowe look set to decide tomorrow to write to the governor of Texas, Rick Perry, to voice their regret and concern over the way Elliott's case was handled.

PLEAS failed to save his life, but protests over John "Jackie" Elliott's execution will certainly ensure he is not forgotten.

Town councillors in his home town of Felixstowe look set to decide tomorrow to write to the governor of Texas, Rick Perry, to voice their regret and concern over the way Elliott's case was handled.

Former mayor Harry Dangerfield does not believe justice was done because not every shred of evidence was fully examined before Elliott was killed by the state – and he is asking his fellow councillors to support a protest.

"I don't know what the other councillors will think, but I believe as his home town we should make some sort of statement on this case – on the treatment given to one of our own people," said Mr Dangerfield.


You may also want to watch:


"Jackie Elliott may have been guilty or not guilty, but now we shall never know. If the extra evidence could have been examined we would have a clearer idea.

"It may have proved he was guilty, but then it might have stopped an innocent man being executed.

Most Read

"I just think we should say something and at least express our regret at the way it was handled. The town council might just do that or decide to write to the Texas governor or the US courts, we shall see."

Elliott was executed by lethal injection last month after 16 years on America's death row for the rape and murder of 18-year-old Joyce Munguia.

Campaigners, including Suffolk Coastal MP John Gummer, tried to persuade the courts and authorities to re-open Elliot's case so DNA tests could be done which they claimed could have proved his innocence.

Elliott always admitted being present while the teenager was gang-raped and beaten with a motorbike chain. He said: "Yes I did see her die, but it wasn't me that killed her."

His lawyers wanted blood-spattered shoes from another suspect to be tested with forensic techniques not available at the time of the trial.

Construction worker Elliott, 42, was born and lived until he was four at Felixstowe with his parents, Robert – who was stationed at USAF Bentwaters air base – and Dorothy. His mum would still like to clear his name but says hiring a lawyer to continue the fight could be expensive.

Mr Dangerfield added: "The jurors in the case all wanted the DNA tests to be done so all the evidence could be assessed, and it does not seem right at all that he was executed before this could be done."

WEBLINKS: www.jackelliott.org

www.felixstowe.gov.uk

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus