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Country commuters' traffic warning

PUBLISHED: 17:11 10 February 2002 | UPDATED: 11:19 03 March 2010

A WARNING has been sounded that the main route into a rapidly growing part of rural Suffolk could become overloaded with a large increase of traffic taking people from new homes to work in the county.

A WARNING has been sounded that the main route into a rapidly growing part of rural Suffolk could become overloaded with a large increase of traffic taking people from new homes to work in the county.

Suffolk Coastal District Council has approved outline plans to demolish 162 homes at Woodbridge Airfield and replace them with modern houses.

But fears were voiced at the council's development control sub-committee meeting that people would be forced to drive into Ipswich, Woodbridge, Colchester or elsewhere to find work due to a lack of employment opportunities and facilities in the area around the isolated old air base.

George Franks, district councillor for Ufford, warned that the increase in traffic would be far more significant than that envisaged when the nearby National Trust centre at Sutton Hoo is opened.

There is only one road going from Melton over the Ipswich to Lowestoft railway line and Wilford Bridge to the Woodbridge Airfield and surrounding villages.

Queues rapidly build up when the railway crossing is closed for a train and, when there is maintenance work on Wilford Bridge, motorists are sent on a lengthy detour up the A12 and back through Campsea Ashe.

He endorsed the comments of Sutton Parish Council who said that it did not want the number of houses to be increased above 162.

The parish council was unhappy with the proposal to erect blocks of garages away from the new houses and they said this could lead to vandalism.

The plan was submitted by Annington Developments who wanted planning permission before selling the 11-hectare site to a developer. The company said that the properties, first built in the 1960s as married quarters for British and American personnel, were in a poor condition and it would be uneconomical to bring them up to modern standards.


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