Curtis cheered up by football gift

FOOTBALL fan Curtis Hook's road to recovery may be slow but a present from his favourite team has made the wait a little more bearable.For while he may not be able to kick a ball round with friends, because of the risk of him re-injuring the two fingers that were nearly sliced off in a sanding machine, he can boast about the special gift sent to him by Liverpool Football Club.

FOOTBALL fan Curtis Hook's road to recovery may be slow but a present from his favourite team has made the wait a little more bearable.

For while he may not be able to kick a ball round with friends, because of the risk of him re-injuring the two fingers that were nearly sliced off in a sanding machine, he can boast about the special gift sent to him by Liverpool Football Club.

The boys from Anfield have sent him an envelope of Liverpool items, including a souvenir brochure, a pen, a letter signed by Michael Owen and a certificate saying thanks for his support autographed by all the team.

With a big smile on his face 14-year-old Curtis said: "The rest of my family support Ipswich but I've never supported anyone else but Liverpool. Michael Owen is one of my favourites.

"It's great that they've sent me all this."

His dad, Ivan, knew about the surprise that had been organised by the Evening Star, but had kept Curtis in the dark.

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"He had no idea," Mr Hook said. "He thought someone from health and safety was coming round.

"It was really unexpected and we'd like to thank everybody at the Star."

Curtis was on work experience at Classic Design Furniture in Great Blakenham at the beginning of the month when his hand got stuck in the belt of the machine.

A third of the middle finger on his left hand was left hanging off while the underside of his ring finger on the same hand had been torn away.

Curtis had to spend two hours in surgery while his finger was repaired and was told by specialists at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital that he would be scarred for life and have to undergo physiotherapy to regain full use of his hand again.

A few weeks on the fingers are not as painful as they once were and are slowly healing but there is still a long way to go.

He said: "They're getting better gradually."

Mr Hook added: "We're still going to Norwich once a week to see a specialist."

While his fingers continue to get better, Curtis is finding there is still a lot he is unable to do and said his mum, Lorraine, is keeping a careful eye on him to ensure he does not do anything to hurt them again.

"I can't do much at the moment," he said. "I can't play football, I can't go swimming, I can't play golf and I can't go out too far.

"I can't do anything that might knock it again."

Mr Hook added: "We just have to watch him all the time until it's healed up a bit more."

The Hooks remain thankful, however, that the damage to Curtis' fingers was not worse. It was feared initially that he may have had to have part of his finger amputated as a result of the accident.

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