Cycling on the prom is so popular it should be legal

Should cycling be allowed on prom at quiet times?

Should cycling be allowed on prom at quiet times? - Credit: Archant

IT’S time cycling along Felixstowe prom was permitted. So many people are now doing it, it doesn’t make sense for it to be outlawed – just controlled properly.

Most cyclists don’t even realise they are breaking a by-law.

There are fewer than a handful of “no cycling” signs along the prom, and none at the natural entrances for cyclists at Manor End, Orford Road and Undercliff Road East, so prosecutions – if the police or the council were of a mind to take enforcement action – would probably not stand up in any case.

During our almost daily walk along the prom – we do it at least four or five evenings a week – one night last week we spotted 15 cyclists and six barbecues on the beach (also banned). Walkers? Around a dozen.

The prom is wide enough for sensible cyclists and walkers, and most riders would not be reckless on such a route.

Most are cycling at times when there is no-one, or very few people, walking. I know several people who work at the port and use it as their route for an early morning shift.

I cannot believe anyone would cycle the route on a Sunday afternoon when it is packed with people enjoying a post-lunch stroll. Or while there is a major event taking place. There would be no fun cycling then anyway.

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Rules, though, would help everyone.

Cycling should be permitted before 9.30am and after 4.30pm each day – when there are few people walking and plenty of space.

Riders should also be required to cycle at a moderate or slow speed and keep well clear of any pedestrians.

A new by-law in these terms would highlight the issue, make legal what is already practised by a growing number and make the situation clearer.