Days Gone By - Memories of the Stoke area of Ipswich

The Eagle Tavern, Wherstead Road, Ipswich, in March 1975.

The Eagle Tavern, Wherstead Road, Ipswich, in March 1975.

The Stoke area of Ipswich has featured recently in Days Gone By, writes David Kindred.

Brian Schofield recalls having a perfect view of the Ipswich ÒLocoÓ yard from his Ipswich home. This

Brian Schofield recalls having a perfect view of the Ipswich ÒLocoÓ yard from his Ipswich home. This photograph from Luther Road features the Britannia Class 70005 John Milton with a London to Norwich express. To the left of the line is Ipswich loco depot with the repair shops. The coal tower featured, for lifting trucks and tipping coal, was demolished December 7, 1961. (Photo by Aubrey Frost).

And readers have been sending in their own memories of this area.

Brian Schofield, of Rigny-Usse, France said: “The articles on the Stoke area of Ipswich have brought back many memories, as I spent most of my young life over Stoke.

“I was born at 102 Wherstead Road, just before the Second World War. After that my parents moved to Tunnel Cottages, overlooking Ipswich Station.

“Unfortunately my mother became ill and died in 1945. After a spell, living at my grandmother’s (102 Wherstead Road), father remarried and they took over the shop located at the corner of Martin Road and Philip Road. I went to Luther Road school up to 1951. I can remember all the names of the pupils in my class, some of whom I am still in contact with.

Who was on the keyboard at the Eagle Tavern, Ipswich, in 1975?

Who was on the keyboard at the Eagle Tavern, Ipswich, in 1975?

“I well remember Station Street in the 40s and 50s, notably the general store at the top of the street where one could buy all sorts of delights. Then there was Garrards the bakers (or maybe it was Jennings), where we used to buy hot rolls from the oven. The whole area of Stoke was a train spotters’ paradise - not only had I lived overlooking the station, but also in a house overlooking the Ipswich Motive Power Depot (known as ‘the Loco’), where I could hang out of the back window and watch the comings and goings of the various engines.

“Also Luther Road school was close to the main line to London and sometimes I dared, with other boys, to go over the fence and climb onto the footplates, to be chased off by railway officials. Most probably by Richard Hardy, who was shed master there in the very early 1950s.

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“In 1958, after some wandering around the world in the merchant navy, I worked at Cocksedge & Co. Ltd., in the girder shop, alongside Stan Adle and Wally Barber and several others. Then in 1959 National Service called.

“I do recall, in 1960, watching Richard Attenborough filming ‘The Angry Silence’ at the top of Cowell Street. The cinema and films are still one of my interests, perhaps due to my stepmother, (the bit player, as I called her).

Who were serving drinks at the Eagle Tavern in 1975?

Who were serving drinks at the Eagle Tavern in 1975?

“I see that many of the pubs in Stoke have disappeared or closed. They were great social centres. My grandmother’s favourite was the Eagle Tavern, at the top of Bath Street. When my father married for the third time we lived in Croft Street, opposite the Great Eastern tavern.

“It was difficult to know where to start with all these memories, I have so many. The floods of 1953, the great cranes being moved out of Ransomes & Rapiers, the trips down the Orwell on the River Lady and many others.”

Mr G Potter, of Claydon, said: “I lived with my mother and father at 104 Bath Street, Ipswich, on the corner of Robinson Street, not far from the Griffin pub where the ferry man rowed people across to the promenade.

“I also remember the paddle steamers, the Norfolk and Suffolk, that took passengers along the Orwell before the River Lady, also a German plane crashing during World War Two. “One of the crew landed on the roof of a house in Harland Street. When I left school I went onto the barge May, owned by Cranfields.

Customers enjoying a drink in the bar at the Eagle Tavern, Ipswich, in March 1975.

Customers enjoying a drink in the bar at the Eagle Tavern, Ipswich, in March 1975.

“They were good old days.”

Jean Hughes (nee Steward), of Ipswich, said: “Days Gone By recently featured a milkman delivering in Ipswich from churns on a horse- drawn cart. An Ipswich reader has identified her father in the photograph.

“The man holding the horse was my dad Cyril “Charlie” Steward. I have a photograph taken in the 1950s when he was delivering in the Grove Lane, Wellesley Road area of Ipswich, with his mate Herbert Collins, who was known as “Nutty”.

“Dad worked at the Cox Lane, Ipswich dairy until it moved to Sproughton Road. He was a milkman at the Co-op all his life, apart from the Second World War period when he was in the RAF.”

The River Lady recalled by Brian Schofield and Mr G Potter took passengers on pleasure trips along t

The River Lady recalled by Brian Schofield and Mr G Potter took passengers on pleasure trips along the River Orwell in the 1950s. This photograph was taken from near Bourne Bridge. Do you remember the River Lady?

An Ipswich garage from the early years of motoring featured recently and Mrs F Girling emailed to say: “Re the photograph of Shaw Baker and Shaw automobile and aeronautical engineers garage in Felixstowe Road.

“My husband remembers when he used to take his vehicle there in the 1950s, but the name had changed to Prentice Aircraft & Cars Ltd, Ipswich. We have an invoice dated May 31, 1957. The car was a lovely old Hillman 10 Tourer, No. ALO.20. T

“he total cost of servicing, which included oiling, greasing, spraying springs, fitting one new cable and adjuster, re-assembling and adjusting all brakes, and road testing, cost £5. 0s 4p! How times have changed!”

Cyril Steward (right) on his milk round around 1930.

Cyril Steward (right) on his milk round around 1930.

Share your memories below.

See more from Days Gone By here


Cyril Stewart (left) and Herbert Collins on a milk round in Ipswich in the 1950s. Do you recall whe

Cyril Stewart (left) and Herbert Collins on a milk round in Ipswich in the 1950s. Do you recall when most homes had their milk delivered this way?

Shaw Baker and ShawÕs Felixstowe Road, Ipswich garage.

Shaw Baker and ShawÕs Felixstowe Road, Ipswich garage.

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