Death crash teenager acquitted

THE family of a Suffolk woman who died after being hit by a car has spoken of the gap in their lives following the acquittal of a teenager accused of causing her death by dangerous driving.

Jane Hunt

THE family of a Suffolk woman who died after being hit by a car has spoken of the gap in their lives following the acquittal of a teenager accused of causing her death by dangerous driving.

Mother-of-four Carol Myhill, 61, had just finished work at the Wentworth Hotel in Aldeburgh and was pushing her bike along the pavement in Victoria Road when she was struck by a car driven by 18-year-old James Sadler.

Mrs Myhill suffered serious head injuries and died despite the efforts of RNLI members who had been attending a first aid meeting nearby and rushed to the scene.


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Sadler, of Andrew Close, Leiston admitted causing Mrs Myhill's death by dangerous driving in July and is awaiting sentence.

Last week his friend Jake Strowger, also 18, of Theberton went on trial at Ipswich Crown Court also accused of causing Mrs Myhill's death by dangerous driving.

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It was alleged that although Strowger hadn't been behind the wheel of the car that struck Mrs Myhill he and Sadler had been racing each other and driving dangerously shortly before the accident.

Yesterday a jury found Strowger not guilty of causing Mrs Myhill's death by dangerous driving and afterwards her family authorised the release of a victim personal statement which described the impact of her death in February.

One of Mrs Myhill's daughters Vanessa Crane said: “We are a very close family and we all feel that we have lost a very close and dear friend. Mum's house seemed to be the place where we all used to congregate on special occasions such as Christmas, birthdays and the Aldeburgh Carnival and she was the link between the whole family.

“We have found the death of mum very difficult to come to terms with as it seems such a waste of a good, loving and caring person's life who gave so much and still had so much to give as a mother, daughter, sister and caring friend.”

Mrs Crane said her brother Justin, who went to the scene of the accident and saw paramedics trying to revive his mother at the roadside, had suffered sleep problems since the incident.

In addition every time he travelled into Aldeburgh and passed the scene of the accident he was reminded of what had happened.

Mrs Crane, who also has two sisters Sharon and Mandy, said their grandmother had lived with their mother and following the accident she had had to move to Felixstowe to live with Mandy.

“My nan's life has been turned upside down, as not only has she lost her daughter but also she has had to move house so she can be cared for properly.”

She said Mrs Myhill was also missed by her sister Diane Courlander and staff and guests at the Wentworth Hotel in Aldeburgh where she had worked for 22 years.

During his trial Strowger denied that he and Sadler had been racing each other during a late night journey from Leiston to Aldeburgh to buy food from a take-away but did admit breaking the speed limit by about 5mph.

Strowger accepted that after reaching Aldeburgh he had driven one-and-a-half times round a roundabout but denied his tyres had been screeching.

He said that after turning off the roundabout into Victoria Road Sadler had suddenly overtaken him before losing control of his car on a bend and hitting Mrs Myhill, who was walking along the pavement with her bicycle.

During Strowger's trial the court heard that on April 2, within weeks of Mrs Myhill's death, he was caught speeding in Leiston and had been clocked at driving at 38mph in a 30mph limit.

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