Death of top judge

SUFFOLK's legal profession was in mourning today after the death of one of its top judges.John Turner was the resident judge at Ipswich Crown Court for more than a decade where he oversaw serious cases including robberies, assaults and burglaries.

SUFFOLK's legal profession was in mourning today after the death of one of its top judges.

John Turner was the resident judge at Ipswich Crown Court for more than a decade where he oversaw serious cases including robberies, assaults and burglaries.

Despite the severity of such cases Judge Turner never found it easy sending people to prison.

At his retirement in 1998 he said: "I do not like sending people to prison, but if the case warrants it and it's for the protection of the public it is something that has to be done."


You may also want to watch:


Judge Turner spent almost 50 years in the legal profession before hanging up his wig and gown six years ago.

In that time he worked in Colchester, Chelmsford, Brentwood and Southend and even opened a branch in Norwich where he was head of chambers.

Most Read

Born in Coggeshall, Essex in 1929, Judge Turner attended the local Church of England primary school before going to Earls Colne Grammar School.

He began studying law in 1948 in chambers and was called to the Bar four years later.

His father Wilfred was a solictor's clerk and Judge Turner claimed that he knew from an early age he wanted to go into law.

Throughout his time in Ipswich he found his role as a judge rewarding and summed up his achievements as "contibuting – even by sending people to prison – to the lives of other people."

A keen cricket fan Judge Turner spent his retired years watching the sport from his home in Sudbury.

He leaves behind wife Gillian, daughters Sarah and Jane and grandchildren Angus and James.

A service of thanksgiving will take place for Judge Turner on Friday at St Mary's Church in Bures.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter