DIY kestrel is flying free

A KESTREL is today enjoying life back in the wild following a two-day adventure at an Ipswich DIY store.The baffled bird was left wondering where to go after it managed to fly into the B&Q warehouse on the White House retail park before making its way into the main store.

A KESTREL is today enjoying life back in the wild following a two-day adventure at an Ipswich DIY store.

The baffled bird was left wondering where to go after it managed to fly into the B&Q warehouse on the White House retail park before making its way into the main store.

Staff and customers looked on concerned as the small bird of prey flew around looking for a way out.

It soon became clear the kestrel was not going to find its own way out so staff began hatching a plan to free their new feathered friend.


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Denise Kerrigan, who works at B&Q, said: “All the staff would watch him flying backwards and forwards and we were very worried about it because obviously it couldn't get any food while it was inside.

“We contacted Suffolk Owl Sanctuary and they told us to keep an eye on it and try and catch it if we could.

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“After a couple of days we eventually managed to get it thanks to a pond net and a length of copper tubing.”

The bird, which has been dubbed “Lucky” thanks to its fortunate escape, was checked over by staff at the Suffolk Owl Sanctuary.

David Nadauld, education officer at the sanctuary, said Lucky appeared in good shape following his escapades although it was decided the team would look after him for a night to ensure it was well enough to re-enter the wild.

Mr Nadauld said: “A lot of the time we have birds brought to us that are healthy but can't go back into the wild for some reason or other so it's nice to be able to return them when you can.

“It's the best part of our job.”

n. Have you experienced an unusual visitor? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk

Kestrels are a familiar sight with their pointed wings and long tail, hovering beside a roadside verge.

Kestrels have been recently declining as a result of habitat degradation due to continuing intensive management of farmland and so it is included on the Amber List.

They have adapted readily to man-made environments and can survive right in the centre of cities.

Kestrels are found in a wide variety of habitats, from moor and heath, to farmland and urban areas.

The only places they do not favour are dense forests, vast treeless wetlands and mountains.

They can often be seen perched on a high tree branch, or on a telephone post or wire, on the look out for prey.

Source: RSPB

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